Corey Campbell
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cadet Corey Campbell marches, carrying his ruck, during the Leadership Course in 2004 at (then) Fort Lewis, Washington. He was recently promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel while serving as the chief plans officer in the distribution integration branch of the support operations at the 1st Theater Sustainment Command at Fort Knox, Kentucky. (Photo Credit: Courtesy) VIEW ORIGINAL
Corey Campbell
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Capt. Corey Campbell holds his children close at Fort Liberty, North Carolina, after returning home from serving in Iraq in 2007. Campbell was recently promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel at Fort Knox, Kentucky, while serving as a plans officer with the 1st Theater Sustainment Command. (Photo Credit: Courtesy) VIEW ORIGINAL
Corey Campbell
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Lt. Col. Corey Campbell, chief plans officer in the distribution integration branch of the support operations section, 1st Theater Sustainment Command, stands with his wife and children after his promotion, October 4, 2023, at Fort Knox, Kentucky. (Photo Credit: Barbara Gersna) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT KNOX, Ky. – He grew up here, graduated from the University of Louisville, and was commissioned as an Army officer through the Reserve Officer Training Corps. This Cardinal is happy to be back on his home turf and serving at Fort Knox since June 2022.

Lt. Col. Corey Campbell, chief plans officer in the distribution integration branch of the support operations section, 1st Theater Sustainment Command, was promoted to his rank, October 4, 2023, surrounded by family, friends, and colleagues.

Col. Clydea Prichard-Brown, chief of staff, 1st TSC, and mentor, hosted his reenlistment ceremony and complimented Campbell on his dedication to service. “Corey is a phenomenal officer, father, husband, son, and all-around wonderful person,” she said.

Campbell is one of the theater logistics planners supporting the U.S. Central Command in its area of responsibility. Planning, distribution, setting the theater, enabling joint reception, and handling movement is what he does.

“I served with the 1st TSC as a captain at Fort Liberty, North Carolina,” Campbell said.

“Establishing the distribution network and some of the transportation routes was part of my planning effort even back then, and to see it come to fruition is very rewarding. Now planning on the things we’re going to be doing in the next 5-10 years is also rewarding, because it is something tangible that I can see,” he added.

Campbell likes working in logistics because it involves critical thinking. “I must analyze shortages and look at the logistics we have and solve problems,” the chief plans officer said.

“Logistics is involved in everything we do,” Campbell explained. “Where did ‘it’ come from? How did ‘it’ get there? It had to be part of someone’s stock,” he said. “Even in the civilian sector, it’s literally part of everything we do.”

Campbell has many accomplishments serving as a logistics officer and deployed with the First Infantry Division to Iraq, and to multiple countries in the Middle East while serving with the 1st TSC.

“The Army has afforded me many opportunities over the years,” he said.

“I was able to use the Army’s Tuition Assistance Program to attain my first master’s degree while I served. Thanks to the Army’s military discounted rate, I attained my second master’s degree for a fraction of the full cost. Now I can pass on my GI Bill to my children to help them get a good start on their education,” he said.

The Valley High School graduate has experienced a lot since his time wrestling and running cross country just 20 miles north of Fort Knox in Valley Station, Kentucky.

He has travelled to 41 of the 50 states. He’s been to seven different countries and had some positive experiences helping people throughout the world. “These are things I might not of had the opportunity to do if I didn’t serve in the Army,” he said. “My family has also benefited by attending some of the best schools in the country, becoming well rounded students, and learning resiliency.”

He is the fourth generation in his family to serve in the military. “I mainly joined to serve my country and help people,” he said.

With 27 years in the Army and 17 years away from Louisville, he’s back home establishing roots. “We bought a house, and have been enjoying spending time with my family,” he said.

“It is amazing being back home, Campbell said. “When we graduated from U of L, my wife said she’d follow me throughout the world, but when our kids start high school, it would be great if we could be back in Louisville. Fortunately, the way the Army worked out, here we are, and our youngest daughter started high school last year.”

His kids have been spending time with their grandparents and reconnecting. His wife, Celia, is also from Louisville, so her family and parents are here too.

“My mom is happy to see me and the grandkids more,” Campbell said. “She is really excited about it.” His mother has worked for the Louisville Public Library for 20 years.

When he’s not planning logistics for the 1st TSC, Campbell likes to attend some of the many festivals in Louisville.

“My children and I recently attended World Fest at the waterfront where we sampled cuisine from all over the world,” he said.

In October he plans to attend the St. James Art Fair in downtown Louisville. It’s one of the largest outdoor art fairs in the nation and has been an annual staple in Louisville culture for more than 50 years. “We also love to sample some of the many local restaurants in the Louisville area. The Steak and Bourbon Restaurant in East Louisville is one of our favorites,” he said.

With their roots planted back in Louisville, the Campbell’s are happy to be back home, and the plans officer is enjoying serving with the 1st TSC again at his favorite Army installation.