New Antiterrorism Strategic Plan coming this fiscal year

By Christopher Hurd, Army News ServiceAugust 15, 2023

U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Dexter James, left, Spc. Brenda Rodriguez-Alvarado, center, and Spc. Logan Burns, right, with the 143d Expeditionary Sustainment Command, work together to stabilize and apply gauze to the leg of an injured role player during an active shooter drill at King Faisal Air Base, Jordan, May 19, 2023. Knowing how to respond appropriately if an active shooter is present is essential to prevent loss of life. While the run, hide, and fight strategy is commonly taught to Soldiers throughout the U.S. Army, Soldiers assigned at KFAB put their knowledge to the test in a training environment.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Dexter James, left, Spc. Brenda Rodriguez-Alvarado, center, and Spc. Logan Burns, right, with the 143d Expeditionary Sustainment Command, work together to stabilize and apply gauze to the leg of an injured role player during an active shooter drill at King Faisal Air Base, Jordan, May 19, 2023. Knowing how to respond appropriately if an active shooter is present is essential to prevent loss of life. While the run, hide, and fight strategy is commonly taught to Soldiers throughout the U.S. Army, Soldiers assigned at KFAB put their knowledge to the test in a training environment. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Cecilia Soriano) VIEW ORIGINAL
Columbus Division of Police SWAT personnel participate in a simulated active aggressor exercise at the Maj. Gen. Robert S. Beightler Armory in Columbus, Ohio, April 14, 2023. Over 20 organizations participated in a two-day exercise that validated collective response capabilities of state and local law enforcement and other civil authorities during emergency scenarios. Simulated victims and aggressors for the exercise were provided by the Ohio Military Reserve, as well as the Franklin County and Columbus Medical Reserve Corps.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Columbus Division of Police SWAT personnel participate in a simulated active aggressor exercise at the Maj. Gen. Robert S. Beightler Armory in Columbus, Ohio, April 14, 2023. Over 20 organizations participated in a two-day exercise that validated collective response capabilities of state and local law enforcement and other civil authorities during emergency scenarios. Simulated victims and aggressors for the exercise were provided by the Ohio Military Reserve, as well as the Franklin County and Columbus Medical Reserve Corps. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Aven Santiago) VIEW ORIGINAL

WASHINGTON — The Department of the Army is working on a new Antiterrorism Strategic Plan that is scheduled to roll out this fiscal year.

The plan, which is being coordinated with the Department of Defense, will update policy, training, exercises and how the Army analyzes and shares information about terrorism.

“The threats we faced 20 years ago aren’t the threats we face today, nor are they the threats we will face in the future,” said Maj. Gen. Duane R. Miller, Army provost marshal general. “Our adversaries are constantly evolving with the use of technology to identify vulnerabilities. It’s through this strategic plan that we hope to address any vulnerabilities and any threats we may face in the future.”

The program will help put Army civilians, contractors, Soldiers and their families on common ground with the service’s antiterrorism goals and objectives moving forward, he added.

The Army’s Antiterrorism Division worked with multiple federal organizations, including the Department of Homeland Security, as they developed the antiterrorism program. This allowed them to share information on best practices and emerging technologies that could pose a threat.

Training, education and awareness remain the key elements in the service’s efforts to prevent terrorism at home and overseas, Miller said.

Soldiers from the 91st Military Police Battalion test their skills during an active shooter hostile event response (ASHER) scenario March 21 during Mountain Guardian Academy training at Fort Drum. Personnel from Fort Drum Fire and Emergency Services and South Jefferson Rescue Squad provided support in creating a more realistic exercise for the Soldiers.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the 91st Military Police Battalion test their skills during an active shooter hostile event response (ASHER) scenario March 21 during Mountain Guardian Academy training at Fort Drum. Personnel from Fort Drum Fire and Emergency Services and South Jefferson Rescue Squad provided support in creating a more realistic exercise for the Soldiers. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Mike Strasser) VIEW ORIGINAL
Following months of planning, HRC partnered with Fort Knox emergency services to conduct an active shooter training exercise at the Maude Complex at Fort Knox June 22, 2023. Emergency responders were met with a variety of unknown crises including locating the shooter, numerous casualties, difficulty accessing areas and communication issues – all to help improve processes in the event of a real incident.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Following months of planning, HRC partnered with Fort Knox emergency services to conduct an active shooter training exercise at the Maude Complex at Fort Knox June 22, 2023. Emergency responders were met with a variety of unknown crises including locating the shooter, numerous casualties, difficulty accessing areas and communication issues – all to help improve processes in the event of a real incident. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Jenn DeHaan) VIEW ORIGINAL

“The more aware our community members are, the more likely we are to obtain advanced warning to defend against terrorist attacks,” he said. “Constant vigilance, timely threat reporting, knowledge of antiterrorism prevention measures and Army leadership advocacy are vital to sustained prevention.”

August is dedicated as Antiterrorism Awareness Month to educate members of the Army on the threat and provide information on how to prevent acts of terrorism.

“Soldiers who are aware of the risks and who report concerning behavior can help prevent threats from impacting the local community,” he said. “Don’t be a bystander. Do your part as a member of the team.”

According to Miller, the fight against terrorism has shifted in recent years from terrorist groups overseas to individual domestic terrorists fueled by extremist ideologies.

To combat the evolving threat, the Army has updated the antiterrorism program and continues to look for ways to improve protection efforts. The service is continuing to field and expand the capability of the Joint Analytic Real-time Virtual Information Sharing System.

JARVISS is a desktop and mobile application that pulls information from more than 80,000 sources to give commanders real-time data on potential threats, so they can make informed decisions.

Members of the Anchorage Police Department SWAT unit work through an active shooter/hostage scenario on the UAA campus June 13, 2023. The active shooter portion is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners.
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Members of the Anchorage Police Department SWAT unit work through an active shooter/hostage scenario on the UAA campus June 13, 2023. The active shooter portion is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by Robert DeBerry) VIEW ORIGINAL
Members of the Anchorage Police Department SWAT unit work through an active shooter/hostage scenario on the UAA campus June 13, 2023. The active shooter portion is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners.
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Members of the Anchorage Police Department SWAT unit work through an active shooter/hostage scenario on the UAA campus June 13, 2023. The active shooter portion is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by Robert DeBerry) VIEW ORIGINAL
Anchorage FBI Evidence Response Team and the Mississippi National Guard’s 47th Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Response Team collect evidence for a notional lab consisting of simulated biological agents that could be used in the manufacture of biological weapons at the Anchorage Fire Department Fire Training Center in Anchorage, Alaska, June 13, 2023. The emergency response training is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd WMD-CST, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners.
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Anchorage FBI Evidence Response Team and the Mississippi National Guard’s 47th Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Response Team collect evidence for a notional lab consisting of simulated biological agents that could be used in the manufacture of biological weapons at the Anchorage Fire Department Fire Training Center in Anchorage, Alaska, June 13, 2023. The emergency response training is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd WMD-CST, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by Robert DeBerry) VIEW ORIGINAL
Team members with the Washington National Guard’s 10th Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, work through an emergency scenario consisting of a simulated radiological weapon that could be used in the manufacture of a dirty bomb on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus June 13, 2023. The emergency response training is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd WMD-CST, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners.
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Team members with the Washington National Guard’s 10th Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team, work through an emergency scenario consisting of a simulated radiological weapon that could be used in the manufacture of a dirty bomb on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus June 13, 2023. The emergency response training is part of ORCA 2023, a biennial exercise designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures, and collaborate with first response agencies across the state. The exercise, hosted by the Alaska National Guard’s 103rd WMD-CST, included 12 National Guard units from Alaska, Washington, Nebraska, Mississippi, Kansas, Ohio, Hawaii, and Kentucky, eight local and state entities, three federal agencies, and various community partners. (Photo Credit: Alaska National Guard photo by Robert DeBerry) VIEW ORIGINAL

Along with advances in technology, the Army and the National Guard continue to conduct annual exercises to stay ready. The Ohio National Guard held their emergency response exercise in April with support from local emergency services.

The exercise evaluated how the responding agencies can affect control and containment of the situation as well as the effectiveness of the facilities’ response capabilities.

National Guard units from 12 states along with multiple federal and local agencies completed an emergency response exercise at the Anchorage Fire Department Fire Training Center in June. The training is designed to maintain readiness, validate response procedures and collaborate with partners.

These efforts, along with others throughout the service, allow the Army and local partners to stay vigilant in the fight against terrorism.

“We must understand the threat and be prepared to prevent any impact on Army readiness,” Miller said. “We’re confident the outcomes from implementing the strategy will align policy, training, doctrine, partnerships and information sharing to meet the challenges of terrorism over the horizon.”

Army personnel can report suspicious behavior to their chain of command or submit a report online through INSCOM's iSALUTE form.

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Fort Drum MPs train with fire, emergency services personnel on active shooter drills at Mountain Guardian Academy

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