Soldiers prepare for TRADOC career counselor of the year competition
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Staff Sgt. Randall Peaslee, with the 15th Military Police Brigade, poses for a photo outside of his office with the trophy he received for being the Fort Leavneworth 2022 career counselor of the year. (Photo Credit: Russell Toof) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers prepare for TRADOC career counselor of the year competition
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. Patrina Booker poses for a photo outside the Fort Leavenworth garrison headquarters building. Booker, assigned to the 15th Military Police Bridge, is the Retention Noncommissioned Officer of the year for Fort Leavenworth. (Photo Credit: Russell Toof) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers prepare for TRADOC career counselor of the year competition
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. Patrina Booker competes on a sergeant major board during the Fort Leavenworth Retention Noncommissioned Officer competition (Photo Credit: Courtesy) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers prepare for TRADOC career counselor of the year competition
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Staff Sgt. Randall Peaslee (left) conducts quality control of a reenlistment packet during the Fort Leavenworth Career Counselor of the year competition. (Photo Credit: Courtesy) VIEW ORIGINAL

Two Soldiers from the 15th Military Police Brigade will represent Fort Leavenworth at the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Career Counselor and Retention Noncommissioned Officer competition. The career counselor that wins the TRADOC competition will go on to compete at the Secretary of the Army’s Career Counselor of the year competition at the Pentagon. The highest the retention NCO competition will go is TRADOC.

“I’m anxious and nervous but blessed for the opportunity,” said Sgt. Patrina Booker. “I’m excited to get out there and learn.”

Booker joined the Army in 2017 as a corrections specialist and was the retention NCO winner.

The Fort Leavenworth competition consisted of an administrative portion that included the effectiveness of their assigned retention programs, an Army Combat fitness test, a 50-question written test involving policy and regulatory guidance in retention, an oral board, along with a mystery event. The mystery event was a tasking that was practical in nature.

“Learning the policy came easy and it was a good experience,” said Booker.

Staff Sgt. Randall Peaslee, who reclassed to a career counselor from a corrections specialist in 2018, is advancing further than he did the two previous times he competed with other units.

“If I go all the way and win, it would be a dream come true,” said Peaslee. “It would really be a validation of showing how I help other Soldiers. I became a career counselor because of a need I had to help people.”

Booker added her short-term career goal is to reclass to a career counselor for the same reason, to help Soldiers.

The competition at TRADOC will be from Jan. 23 - 27.

Dating back to August 1975, the career counselor of the year was first implemented in the Army to recognize the most outstanding career counselor for their high production.