USASAC visits historic Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center

By Adriane ElliotDecember 1, 2022

USASAC's Commanding General Brig. Gen. Brad Nicholson (7th from left) and Senior Enlisted Advisor Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Rice (9th from left) during a fall 2022 visit to the Joint Pacific   Multinational Readiness Center (JPMRC), the Army's new Combat Training Center headquartered at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. The JPMRC enables joint forces, allies and partners from across the U.S. Army Pacific region to train together, in theater and in real-world environments. The Center trains units and leaders in the region's complex and austere environments. It is the first Combat Training Center the U.S. Army has established in more than 50 years and is the first in the region. Nicholson said "training at the center is key to integrated deterrence and regional security. It serves as a magnet for our allies and partners to collaborate, exercise, experiment and train with the U.S. military in the Indo-Pacific." The U.S. wants to be the partner of choice through security assistance and Foreign Military Sales that provide materiel that promotes interoperability and next generation equipment for modernization. "The Army Security Assistance Enterprise mission is more relevant than ever as we reorient toward great power competition. Security assistance and multilateral exercises increase interactions that strengthen relationships and build trust," said Nicholson.
USASAC's Commanding General Brig. Gen. Brad Nicholson (7th from left) and Senior Enlisted Advisor Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Rice (9th from left) during a fall 2022 visit to the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center (JPMRC), the Army's new Combat Training Center headquartered at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. The JPMRC enables joint forces, allies and partners from across the U.S. Army Pacific region to train together, in theater and in real-world environments. The Center trains units and leaders in the region's complex and austere environments. It is the first Combat Training Center the U.S. Army has established in more than 50 years and is the first in the region. Nicholson said "training at the center is key to integrated deterrence and regional security. It serves as a magnet for our allies and partners to collaborate, exercise, experiment and train with the U.S. military in the Indo-Pacific." The U.S. wants to be the partner of choice through security assistance and Foreign Military Sales that provide materiel that promotes interoperability and next generation equipment for modernization. "The Army Security Assistance Enterprise mission is more relevant than ever as we reorient toward great power competition. Security assistance and multilateral exercises increase interactions that strengthen relationships and build trust," said Nicholson.
(Photo Credit: Courtesy photo)
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USASAC's Commanding General Brig. Gen. Brad Nicholson (7th from left) and Senior Enlisted Advisor Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Rice (9th from left) during a fall 2022 visit to the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center (JPMRC), the Army's new Combat Training Center headquartered at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. The JPMRC enables joint forces, allies and partners from across the U.S. Army Pacific region to train together, in theater and in real-world environments. The Center trains units and leaders in the region's complex and austere environments. It is the first Combat Training Center the U.S. Army has established in more than 50 years and is the first in the region. Nicholson said "training at the center is key to integrated deterrence and regional security. It serves as a magnet for our allies and partners to collaborate, exercise, experiment and train with the U.S. military in the Indo-Pacific." The U.S. wants to be the partner of choice through security assistance and Foreign Military Sales that provide materiel that promotes interoperability and next generation equipment for modernization. "The Army Security Assistance Enterprise mission is more relevant than ever as we reorient toward great power competition. Security assistance and multilateral exercises increase interactions that strengthen relationships and build trust," said Nicholson.