U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground employee named among Yuma County’s ’20 Under 40’
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) employee Sean Franklin was recently recognized by the Yuma Sun newspaper as one of Yuma County’s top ‘20 Under 40’ young professionals. He was nominated by retired YPG employee Mary Lacey, who lauded Franklin’s expertise in his former role as an Information Technology Management Specialist in YPG’s Ground Combat Systems Test Directorate. (Photo Credit: Mark Schauer) VIEW ORIGINAL

He may be young, but Sean Franklin has decades of experience in responsibility and dedication.

An Eagle Scout and nearly six year member of the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) workforce, his achievements are being recognized beyond the borders of the proving ground.

Franklin was recently surprised to learn that he was named by the Yuma Sun newspaper as one of Yuma County’s top ‘20 Under 40’ young professionals.

“I got a phone call and email several months back that I had been nominated,” he recalled. “I didn’t think too much of it with so many other people nominated.”

He was nominated by retired YPG employee Mary Lacey, who lauded Franklin’s expertise in his former role as an Information Technology Management Specialist in YPG’s Ground Combat Systems Test Directorate.

Franklin, the son of YPG pilot Patrick Franklin, grew up in Yuma in a military family. Involved in Scouting since early elementary school, he has performed more than 2,000 hours of community service in Yuma County.

“My dad and his dad were active duty Army, and my mom’s dad was active duty in the Marine Corps. I was very interested in finding some way to contribute back. This is my home.”

Franklin long dreamed of working at YPG, and began applying after graduating from the honors college at Arizona State University. It took 38 tries before he landed a federal position, a moment he still considers the best of his professional career.

“I have a very long understanding of the history and what goes on out here, and really wanted to be a part of it someday. If it took 38 tries or 100 tries, I was going to continue trying. I kept persisting and was finally able to get my foot in the door: I definitely thought it was a mission worth pursuing.”

Now working in YPG's Technology and Investments Directorate, Franklin plans to stay at YPG for the long haul.

“I love that we’re able to help the Soldiers. At the end of the day, that is what the installation’s duty is.”