Bruce K. Griffin
Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera (left), the commanding general of the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command, presents Bruce Griffin with the Army Superior Civilian Service Medal at his retirement ceremony on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Griffin retired after 43 years of uniformed and civilian service with the U.S. Army. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – A U.S. Army civilian program manager at the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Analytical and Remediation Activity (CARA) recently retired following more than four decades of uniformed and civil service.

Bruce K. Griffin, the supervisory program manager for CARA-Remediation Response East, was recognized for his 43 years of service during his retirement ceremony.

CARA is an all-Army civilian organization that conducts recovered chemical material remediation projects, technical escort missions, emergency response missions, contingency operations and special projects. CARA is part of the 20th CBRNE Command. Headquartered on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the 20th CBRNE Command is the U.S. military’s premier multifunctional all hazards formation.

From 19 bases in 16 states, Soldiers and U.S. Army civilians from 20th CBRNE Command tackle the world’s most dangerous hazards in support of joint, interagency and allied operations.

Originally from Brooklyn, New York, Griffin was influenced to join the Army by his uncle Robert who served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

Griffin joined the Army in July 1979 and served as a field artillery cannon crewman. He later became a Nuclear, Biological and Chemical specialist and eventually retired as the chemical sergeant major for the 101st Airborne Division on Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

Army Superior Civilian Service Medal
Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera (left), the commanding general of the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command, presents Bruce Griffin with the Army Superior Civilian Service Medal at his retirement ceremony on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Griffin retired after 43 years of uniformed and civilian service with the U.S. Army. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL

After retiring from the Army, Griffin joined the U.S. Army Technical Escort Unit as an Army civilian Toxic Material Control Operator supervisor. When CARA was established in 2008, Griffin was selected as the CARA Remediation Response-East chief.

During his time at CARA, his Army civilians deployed to Afghanistan, Australia, Iraq, Japan, Panama, Philippines and South Korea.

Griffin said he was guided by his former first sergeant who instilled leadership principles that have carried him through his uniformed and civilian career.

Among them were to always tell your superiors, subordinates and peers what they need to hear, not what they want to hear; to do the right thing when no one is around; to take care of your troops; to make sure that you are loyal to the organization, not to the individual; and to always lead by example.

Griffin said he was proud of his team's accomplishments during his time as a program manager at the one-of-a-kind Army civilian organization. He thanked his team for everything they accomplished over the years.

“During my 14-year tenure as the PM chief at CARA, we never failed a mission,” said Griffin. “It takes a highly trained and well-disciplined workforce to successfully complete the mission.”

Griffin family
Bruce K. Griffin (second from the left) poses with his family at his retirement ceremony at the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Griffin retired after 43 years of uniformed and civilian service in the U.S. Army. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL

Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera, the commanding general of 20th CBRNE Command, said Griffin played a critical role in providing the expertise necessary to stand up the 20th CBRNE Command.

“Thank you for all that you have done for this unit and helping to stand up this unit and for taking care of CARA and for taking care of our Soldiers,” said Munera.

The commanding general said that Army civilians at CARA provide the continuity and expertise to tackle CBRNE threats around the world.

“The expertise to deal with something that is found, whether it is here in the states or overseas, resides within the civilian workforce in CARA and with folks like Bruce,” said Munera, an Army Chemical Corps officer from Fairfax, Virginia.

Dr. Mark W. Fishback, the 20th CBRNE Command deputy to the commanding general and senior Army civilian in the command, thanked Griffin for his service on behalf of all Army civilians at the multifunctional command.

“I know that as you leave this building today you will remain as you always have – strong in faith, family and service,” said Fishback, a North Salem, Indiana, native.