Leaders
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera (left), the commanding general of 20th CBRNE Command, met with Republic of Korea Army Brig. Gen. Chang Ho Kang, the commanding general of the ROK Army Ammunition Command, at the 20th CBRNE Command Headquarters on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. American and South Korean Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians are forging stronger bonds to confront and defeat explosive devices in support of military operations on the Korean Peninsula. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL
Group
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Members of the Republic of Korea Army Ammunition Command recently visited the headquarters for the U.S. Army’s 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command, the U.S. military’s premier all hazards formation. American and South Korean Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians are forging stronger bonds to confront and defeat explosive devices in support of military operations on the Korean Peninsula. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL
Visit
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera (left), the commanding general of 20th CBRNE Command, met with Republic of Korea Army Brig. Gen. Chang Ho Kang, the commanding general of the ROK Army Ammunition Command, at the 20th CBRNE Command Headquarters on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. American and South Korean Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians are forging stronger bonds to confront and defeat explosive devices in support of military operations on the Korean Peninsula. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Andrew D. Monath) VIEW ORIGINAL

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – American and South Korean Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians are forging stronger bonds to confront and defeat explosive devices in support of military operations on the Korean Peninsula.

Members of the Republic of Korea Army Ammunition Command recently visited the headquarters for the U.S. Army’s 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command, the U.S. military’s premier all hazards formation.

Soldiers and U.S. Army civilians from 20th CBRNE Command deploy from 19 bases in 16 states to take on the world’s most dangerous hazards.

Maj. Gen. Antonio V. Munera, the commanding general of 20th CBRNE Command, met with Republic of Korea Army Brig. Gen. Chang Ho Kang, the commanding general of the ROK Army Ammunition Command, during the visit.

Headquartered on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the 20th CBRNE Command is home to 75 percent of the Active Duty U.S. Army’s EOD technicians and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) specialists, as well as the 1st Area Medical Laboratory, CBRNE Analytical and Remediation Activity, five Weapons of Mass Destruction Coordination Teams and three Nuclear Disablement Teams.

Training
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. Alexander Spears, right, and Pfc. Eee-Jay Rodriguez, explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) specialists assigned to the 718th Ordnance Company, 23rd Chemical Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade, assess the location and conditions surrounding a simulated explosive device during comprehensive training with military police from across Humphreys, Feb. 11. For the training, military police reacted to a simulated threat by securing the location and relaying information to the EOD team, who were dispatched to appropriately react to and safely contain the threat. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Matthew Marcellus) VIEW ORIGINAL
Allies
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Pfc. Eee-Jay Rodriguez, right, an explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) specialist assigned to the 718th Ordnance Company, 23rd Chemical Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade, secures an EOD bomb suit helmet for Sgt. Alexander Spears, an EOD specialist also assigned to 718th EOD, during comprehensive training at Humphreys, Feb. 11. The EOD team worked alongside military police to secure, contain and remove a simulated explosive threat to recreate a potential real-life scenario, fortifying the expertise and excellence that is essential to Humphreys. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Matthew Marcellus) VIEW ORIGINAL

Col. Christopher P. Bartos, the operations officer for the 20th CBRNE Command, said the meeting will lead to future training opportunities between to the allied militaries.

“The purpose of the ROK Ammunition Support Command visit was to start the dialogue on how best to collaborate on future U.S.-ROK EOD training and where the 20th can advise on future ROK EOD structure and capability,” said Bartos, a seasoned U.S. Army EOD officer from Edgewater, Florida. “To some degree, the discussion focused on gaining better understanding of each command's capabilities to strengthen interoperability between our EOD forces.”

"We learn from the ROK Army, they learn from our forces, and we become better together,” said Bartos.

According to Bartos, the allies plan to schedule working groups that can advise on command capabilities and schedule training engagements below the platoon level.

Sgt. Maj. Joseph O. Richardson, the 20th CBRNE Command operations sergeant major and the senior EOD noncommissioned officer at the command headquarters, has built relationships that will yield new opportunities for U.S. and ROK EOD training, said Bartos.

The 20th CBRNE Command routinely serves with South Korean military units, from the ROK Nuclear Characterization Teams to the ROK CBRN Defense Command. The U.S. military has 28,500 service members stationed in South Korea who help to maintain security on the Korean Peninsula and stability in Northeast Asia.