Incoming U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Quitugua (left) takes the USACBRNS guidon from Col. Sean Crockett, USACBRNS commandant, during a change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Outgoing Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Williams (right, behind Crockett) is retiring after 33 years of service to the U.S. Army.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Incoming U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Quitugua (left) takes the USACBRNS guidon from Col. Sean Crockett, USACBRNS commandant, during a change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Outgoing Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Williams (right, behind Crockett) is retiring after 33 years of service to the U.S. Army. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office) VIEW ORIGINAL
Incoming U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Quitugua speaks during the change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Quitugua – who is originally from the island of Guam – comes to Fort Leonard Wood from Fort Rucker, Alabama, where he was the Garrison Command Sergeant Major.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Incoming U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Quitugua speaks during the change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Quitugua – who is originally from the island of Guam – comes to Fort Leonard Wood from Fort Rucker, Alabama, where he was the Garrison Command Sergeant Major. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office) VIEW ORIGINAL
Outgoing U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Williams speaks during the change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Williams is retiring after 33 years of service to the U.S. Army.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Outgoing U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School Regimental Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Williams speaks during the change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Williams is retiring after 33 years of service to the U.S. Army. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — The U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School held a change-of-responsibility ceremony Friday in Lincoln Hall Auditorium, where Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Williams relinquished responsibility of the regiment to Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Quitugua.

Col. Sean Crockett, USACBRNS commandant, spoke on the important role Williams has filled over the past three-plus years.

“As the unit commander’s principal advisor, talent manager and overall leader in Soldier training and development, the command sergeant major must communicate effectively along all levels of the organization,” he said.

Command sergeants major affect the command climate through two separate but important areas of responsibility: commanders and the Soldiers under their command, Crockett added.

“(They) support the commander by communicating the organization’s shared vision,” he said. “After all, leadership cannot occur without clear and concise communication between the leader and the led.”

Crockett called Williams the embodiment of transformational and inspirational leadership, “on a daily basis.”

“Just know, the impact you have made on the CBRN Regiment, while serving as our 15th Regimental Command Sergeant Major, will continue long after your departure and truly stand the test of time — thank you,” he said.

Williams, who is retiring after 33 years of service to the Army, thanked his family and the CBRN and Maneuver Support Center of Excellence teams for their support and friendship.

“I hope I was able to make a difference and change things for the better,” he said. “We have a great group of individuals willing to step up. We just have to set the right conditions to allow them to lead and produce.”

Williams called Quitugua the right choice for the Regimental Command Sergeant Major role.

“I’ve seen you grow; I’ve seen you in different positions; I’ve seen you take the initiative,” he said. “You are so ready for this position.”

Quitugua — who is originally from the island of Guam — comes to Fort Leonard Wood from Fort Rucker, Alabama, where he was the Garrison Command Sergeant Major. He called Williams, “both a genuine friend, as well as a sound mentor for me over these last few years.”

“His contributions to the corps through his tireless efforts will resonate long after he leaves,” Quitugua added.

Quitugua also said he is extremely proud and humbled to be joining an “amazing team” here.

“To the exemplary Soldiers, leaders and family members of the U.S. Army’s Chemical Corps, just know that I am here to serve you,” he said. “I may be new to the (Fort Leonard Wood) community, but I am not new to taking care of people. The Chemical Corps has a unique and strategically important mission — we are who stands in between our nation and weapons of mass destruction — of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats and hazards. I do not take this responsibility lightly, because, quite frankly, we cannot afford to. I am extremely proud to now be leading the nation’s premier CBRN counterforce, as you should be as well.”

Crockett congratulated Quitugua on his new position.

“You have a tremendous reputation and wealth of experience,” he said. “Know that you have my trust, confidence and enduring support.”