Pollution Prevention Branch team members
1 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Front Row (left to right) – Ms. Linda Ward, Mr. Kyle Kirchner, Mr. Barry Maples, and Mr. Shawn Handy
Back Row (left to right) – Mr. Owen Wilson, Mr. Brady Deville, and Mr. Jim Hill
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
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Chart generated from database query for a given time period showing the Best Management Practice deficiencies and frequency.  Used to focus the upcoming Environmental Team Training classes and/or provide site assistance visit(s) to the organization(s) to address common compliance issues.
2 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Chart generated from database query for a given time period showing the Best Management Practice deficiencies and frequency. Used to focus the upcoming Environmental Team Training classes and/or provide site assistance visit(s) to the organization(s) to address common compliance issues. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Chart generated from database query for a given time period showing the regulatory deficiencies and frequency.  Used to focus upcoming Environmental Team Training classes.
3 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Chart generated from database query for a given time period showing the regulatory deficiencies and frequency. Used to focus upcoming Environmental Team Training classes. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Example page from the automatically generated Summary Report.  Regulatory deficiencies are shown first, following by Best Management Practice deficiencies.  This example, shows the association of the inspection item, compliance driver (NPDES Permit), and the photographs.
4 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Example page from the automatically generated Summary Report. Regulatory deficiencies are shown first, following by Best Management Practice deficiencies. This example, shows the association of the inspection item, compliance driver (NPDES Permit), and the photographs. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Image of tablet screen and an excerpt from report.  The inserted image (IRR 1 Weekly Inspections) is what will show in the automatically generated reports.  The regulatory citation is shown.
5 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Image of tablet screen and an excerpt from report. The inserted image (IRR 1 Weekly Inspections) is what will show in the automatically generated reports. The regulatory citation is shown. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Image of tablet screen following taking the photograph of the compliance deficiency.  In addition to the photograph, a specific note can be added to the box next to “Info:”.  The information is automatically associated to the specific inspection item.
6 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Image of tablet screen following taking the photograph of the compliance deficiency. In addition to the photograph, a specific note can be added to the box next to “Info:”. The information is automatically associated to the specific inspection item. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Image of inspection question associated with a Satellite Accumulation Point.  The 65 inspection items are grouped by specific areas/topics (e.g., SAP identified in next to “Section”).  If marked non-compliant (NC) the camera icon can be toggle to take a photograph.
7 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Image of inspection question associated with a Satellite Accumulation Point. The 65 inspection items are grouped by specific areas/topics (e.g., SAP identified in next to “Section”). If marked non-compliant (NC) the camera icon can be toggle to take a photograph. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
The tablet in use during a Multi-media environmental compliance inspection.  For field use, the tablet is fitted with a rugged case and hand-held strap.  The image on the tablet screen represents one of the inspection questions.
8 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The tablet in use during a Multi-media environmental compliance inspection. For field use, the tablet is fitted with a rugged case and hand-held strap. The image on the tablet screen represents one of the inspection questions. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
The tablet in use at Compliance Inspector’s workstation.  The tablet/workstation is connected to the government network.
9 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The tablet in use at Compliance Inspector’s workstation. The tablet/workstation is connected to the government network. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

Sometimes, the best solutions come from taking what is on hand, thinking about it in a new way and building something better.

That’s the strategy the team at Fort Riley used in creating the electronic multimedia inspection form and database, a technological way of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the environmental compliance inspections of its motor pools, hangars and maintenance shops. Through this new inspection system data interface, the Fort Riley team created a valuable new tool to better stay on top of environmental compliance at the installation.

“The multimedia inspection form and database we created uses standard Army-issued software products, which means we avoid the complicated data transfer process required if we were to use private-sector providers, and also avoids the use of proprietary software, which also comes at a cost,” said Kyle Kirchner, pollution prevention branch chief.

The system operates on a three-tiered rating system, ranging from green to amber to red, using information collected during inspections.

“The inspection form automatically tallies regulatory and/or best management practice deficiencies discovered during the inspection to assign the rating,” Kirchner said.

A summary report is shared with the organization’s leadership when a red rating is issued and a complete report is issued to the organization’s environmental team to engage them and assist in addressing any deficiencies discovered.

The new inspection forms and the use of standard tablets to compile the data in the field, including photography, makes submitting photos easier than past processes, and makes the inspection reports more useful in solving problems according to Brady Deville, environmental compliance inspector.

“The value in the automatically generated reports, incorporating photographs of noted compliance concerns, for the organization’s environmental team leader and members is a specific visual depiction of the environmental concern that the organization can use for future reference and to communicate with the organization’s line personnel to improve their practices, limiting potential regulatory findings in the event of a state or federal inspection,” said Deville.

Another benefit of the new system is it allows tracking of the installation compliance posture by individual organizations, which improves tracking and helps identify areas of future training through analysis of the report data.

“We are able to use the data we collect to determine the areas where training will be most effective and important, replacing the ‘gut feel’ approach or even the ‘existing training material/presentation is good enough’ approach,” Kirchner said. “This gives us a greater understanding of the issues at hand.”

The multimedia inspection form and database are also being applied to the management of storm water on the installation, and for conducting construction and industrial storm water inspections.