Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
1 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
2 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
3 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
4 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
5 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort McCoy, Ho-Chunk Nation renew agreement during special ceremony
6 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army Color Guard is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis. The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle. This memorandum of understanding between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy represents Fort McCoy’s assumption of the U.S. Army’s legal responsibility under multiple federal laws and presidential executive orders to protect natural, historic, and sacred places with traditional religious and cultural importance to all Native American peoples, but especially those of the Ho Chunk Nation, on who’s aboriginal territory the Fort McCoy military installation is now located. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL

An Army Color Guard from Fort McCoy is shown May 10, 2022, during a special signing ceremony for a memorandum/agreement between the Ho-Chunk Nation and Fort McCoy in Black River Falls, Wis.

The ceremony was held at the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribal Office Building on the east side of Black River Falls and included Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. Michael Poss and Command Sgt. Maj. Raquel DiDomenico, garrison command sergeant major, and Ho-Chunk Nation Chief Clayton Winneshiek and Ho-Chunk Nation President Marlon WhiteEagle.

Fort McCoy Soldiers regularly support Color Guard requests in local communities for special events.

Fort McCoy’s motto is to be the “Total Force Training Center.” Located in the heart of the upper Midwest, Fort McCoy is the only U.S. Army installation in Wisconsin.

The installation has provided support and facilities for the field and classroom training of more than 100,000 military personnel from all services nearly every year since 1984.

Learn more about Fort McCoy online at https://home.army.mil/mccoy, on the Defense Visual Information Distribution System at https://www.dvidshub.net/fmpao, on Facebook by searching “ftmccoy,” and on Twitter by searching “usagmccoy.” Also try downloading the Digital Garrison app to your smartphone and set “Fort McCoy” or another installation as your preferred base.