3 MICC Soldiers vying for ACC best warrior
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Sanders is competing in the Army Contracting Command Best Warrior Competition conducted virtually May 9-13 from Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. Sanders is a contracting NCO from the 919th Contracting Battalion at Fort Bliss, Texas. Sanders is the 418th Contracting Support Brigade’s BWC runner-up. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army ) VIEW ORIGINAL
3 MICC Soldiers vying for ACC best warrior
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Staff Sgt. Mosley is competing in the Army Contracting Command Best Warrior Competition conducted virtually May 9-13 from Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. Mosley is a contracting support NCO with the 922nd Contracting Battalion at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Mosley is the 419th Contracting Support Brigade’s BWC winner. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army ) VIEW ORIGINAL
3 MICC Soldiers vying for ACC best warrior
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. 1st Class Alan Farr is competing in the Army Contracting Command Best Warrior Competition conducted virtually May 9-13 from Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. Farr is a contracting NCO with the 902nd Contracting Battalion at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. Farr is the 418th Contracting Support Brigade’s BWC winner. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army ) VIEW ORIGINAL

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (May 4, 2022) -- Three Mission and Installation Contracting Command Soldiers are among those vying for the chance to earn best warrior honors at the higher headquarters level.

This year’s candidates representing the 418th Contracting Support Brigade are Sgt. 1st Classes Alan Farr, a contracting NCO from the 902nd Contracting Battalion at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, and runner-up Jacob Sanders, a contracting NCO from the 919th CBN at Fort Bliss, Texas. Representing the 419th CSB is Staff Sgt. Stephen Mosley, a contracting support NCO from the 922nd CBN at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

Soldiers representing the command’s two brigades are competing virtually May 9-13 in the Army Contracting Command Best Warrior Competition for the right to move on to the Army Materiel Command level.

The BWC recognizes Soldiers who demonstrate a commitment to the Army values, embody the warrior ethos, and represent the force of the future. The competition features command sergeant major boards assessing each Soldier's breadth and depth on areas such as military leadership, Army history, tactical communications, battle-focused training, U.S. government and the Constitution, and Army Combat Fitness Test.

Sgt. 1st Class Alan Farr

Farr provides operational contracting support and serves as a business adviser to unit commanders on JBLM, providing readiness and quality of life support to more than 46,000 joint service members and Army civilians. He supports both the 418th and 413th CSB procuring an array of services and supplies throughout JBLM and the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command area of responsibility.

The St. Johns, Arizona, native enlisted into the Army in May 2008 as a 92A, automated logistics specialist. He completed basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, before proceeding to Fort Lee, Virginia, where he completed advance individual training in November 2008. In 2020 he re-classified into the Army Acquisition Corps. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and Management from Excelsior College. He also possess a Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act Level I certification in contracting.

Farr said his motivation to compete in the ACC-level Best Warrior Competition is to go above and beyond his normal job requirements and challenge himself to become better and represent to others that a Soldier doesn’t have to be in combat arms to be the best. To be able to compete, Farr credits his mentor and sponsor for the competition, Master Sgt. Jesse Campos, the 902nd CBN Contracting Detachment A noncommissioned officer in charge.

“(Campos) has constantly showed me ways to improve as a Soldier and a person,” Farr said. “He helped me prepare for the board and networked with previous competitors.”

Farr added his family and carrying on my family name as inspirations to compete and face the biggest challenge of this level of competition -- time management, managing both work and family life.

He feels his best event will be preparing and presenting himself in his new Army green service uniform during the oral board event.

Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Sanders

Seeking a fresh start away from the gang-infested city and an opportunity to pay for school, Sanders, originally from Santa Ana, California, entered the Army in August 2010 and completed basic training at Fort Benning to become an 11B, infantryman. He later transitioned to the acquisition field to become a 51C contracting NCO in August 2019.

“I re-classed to become a 51C in order to learn a profession that may open many doors for me in the future,” he said.

Having earned the DAWIA Level II certification in contracting, Sanders holds a bachelor’s degree in Public Safety and Emergency Management and a Master of Leadership from Grand Canyon University.

“I wanted to take the opportunity to represent my contracting detachment and set the example for the junior NCOs that I mentor,” he said. “My professional mentor, Master Sgt. Lloyd Cueto, sets a solid foundation for me to follow and always takes time to make sure I am going on a path of success toward my goals. If I’m successful I will be the Army standard and mirror the Army values to my highest capability.”

Sanders said his biggest challenge to get ready for the competition was balancing his time to study and being with his family. To help with this challenge, Sanders relied on his sponsor for the competition, Master Sgt. Corey Anderson, a 919th CBN CONDET A NCO.

“He helped me prepare by giving me space to execute things I found necessary to focus on,” Sanders said.

Staff Sgt. Stephen Mosley

Mosley, a Dallas native, enlisted in the Texas National Guard in January 2010. He attended basic training at Fort Benning and completed AIT as an interior electrician at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Mosley transitioned to active duty in July 2016 and attended AIT a second time at Fort Eustis, Virginia, to become an avionic mechanic.

Mosley earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in accounting, a Master of Business Administration, and a second Master of Science in Accounting.

Mosley’s participation in the BWC is motivated by change.

“In our career field, we are so in tune with the challenges of changing regulations and various contracting requirements on a daily basis,” he said. “By competing in this competition, I am motivated to prove that NCOs in this career field are able to remain relevant with new Army publications.”

If successful in accomplishing his goal as one of the Army’s best warriors, Mosley feels his role would be to represent the Army.

“I believe my role would become larger in the aspect of increasing awareness of updated Army policies and regulations throughout the force. As NCOs, we currently uphold that standard; however, in this role there would be more of a greater role to influence the knowledge.”

Mosley credits his mentors, Wanda Jobe, a contracting officer, and Bradford Davis, a division chief with the MICC-Fort Campbell contracting office, for his professional development.

“These two individuals challenge me to be creative in the manner in which I think to solve problems and help the warfighter; however, they remind me of the importance of remaining grounded,” he said “They continuously push me to keep reaching new levels to peak and provide sound support in my efforts to continue learning.”

Like his competitors stated before, finding time was the biggest challenge for Mosley.

“I have never competed in a board before, so understanding key points to study to find relevance amongst peers was a major challenge,” he said.

Sgt. 1st Class Katharine Shockley, the 922nd CBN CONDET A NCOIC, helped Mosley prepare by providing study materials to increase overall knowledge and understanding of topics to be covered during the competition.

Mosley said the most challenging event for him will be expressing his knowledge of his profession during the competition.

“I have limited exposure speaking in front of crowds without personal connections,” he said. “However, I am confident in my ability to be successful at each event through preparation.”

About the MICC

Headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Mission and Installation Contracting Command consists of about 1,300 military and civilian members who are responsible for contracting goods and services in support of Soldiers as well as readying trained contracting units for the operating force and contingency environment when called upon. As part of its mission, MICC contracts are vital in feeding more than 200,000 Soldiers every day, providing many daily base operations support services at installations, facilitate training in the preparation of more than 100,000 conventional force members annually, training more than 500,000 students each year, and maintaining more than 14.4 million acres of land and 170,000 structures.