USAG Bavaria energy team finds, fixes inefficiencies
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Bayer Dieter, the Tower Barracks peripheral equipment operator (right), explains a target system that is warmed by heating coils at the Grafenwoehr Training Area on Feb. 8, 2022. (Photo Credit: Julian Temblador) VIEW ORIGINAL
USAG Bavaria energy team finds, fixes inefficiencies
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Pop-up targets are warmed by heated coils underneath them on a range in the Grafenwoehr Training Area on Feb. 8, 2022. (Photo Credit: Julian Temblador) VIEW ORIGINAL
USAG Bavaria energy team finds, fixes inefficiencies
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Bayer Dieter, the Tower Barracks peripheral equipment operator (left), explains a target system that is warmed by heating coils at the Grafenwoehr Training Area on Feb. 8, 2022. (Photo Credit: USAG Bavaria) VIEW ORIGINAL
USAG Bavaria energy team finds, fixes inefficiencies
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Heated coils warm pop-up targets on a range in the Grafenwoehr Training Area. (Photo Credit: USAG Bavaria) VIEW ORIGINAL
USAG Bavaria energy team finds, fixes inefficiencies
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Members of the USAG Bavaria energy management team and electrical operators conduct a site survey at a range in the Grafenwoehr Training Area as a part to improve energy conservation across the Army footprint in Bavaria on Feb. 8, 2022. (Photo Credit: Julian Temblador) VIEW ORIGINAL

GRAFENWOEHR, Germany — The U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria energy management team surveyed a small arms range in the Grafenwoehr Training Area, on Feb. 8. This survey is a part of a larger effort to maximize energy efficiency across the USAG Bavaria footprint.

Paul Hlawatsch, the energy manager of USAG Bavaria, stated that identifying and finding solutions to inefficiencies across the USAG Bavaria footprint will reduce hundreds of thousands of pounds of carbon dioxide emissions and save tens of thousands of dollars on energy costs per year.

“We are looking at ways to innovate and find solutions to energy inefficiency around our installations,” Hlawatsch said. “We always are identifying wasted energy. By finding a solution to this, we can save money and reduce CO2 emissions.”

During the survey, the team of professionals examined the pop-up targets on a small arms range.

According to Bayer Dieter, a peripheral equipment operator for Tower Barracks, the pop-up targets are warmed by heating coils — allowing thermal and infrared optics on a weapon system to properly identify a target. The 155 heating systems on this range are currently on non-stop for 365 days out of the year, as a way to support mission-critical training at any given time.

Following the survey, the team proposed and submitted a solution to install a master switch that can turn the systems on and off from the range control area. This switch will result in an estimated annual savings of over $34,000 and a reduction in over 150,000 pounds of CO2 emissions every year. Installing this master switch would result in a one-month return on investment.

This solution will meet the mission-critical needs of offering units access to essential range operations on short notice, while also meeting the requirements of reducing energy output and emissions.

“Our garrison is the foundation of readiness and fundamental to mission success,” said Col. Christopher Danbeck, the USAG Bavaria Garrison Commander. “Our priority is providing a world-class training environment that bolsters our readiness. We also need to focus on efficiency, resiliency and our duty to reduce our energy consumption. Finding a way to do both is the key, and that’s what is happening here in Bavaria right now.”

Additionally, the energy management team has identified 154 more heated systems on different ranges across the Grafenwoehr Training Area. Installing master switches across the training area for these heat systems will result in an additional annual savings of over $18,000 in energy costs and a reduction of nearly 80,000 pounds of CO2 emissions.

“I am optimistic that we will continue to find, solve and improve how we manage energy across our installations,” Hlawatsch said. “We encourage each member of the community to reach out and report any potential waste of energy or water so that we can identify it and work on a solution.”

The master switch for the initial 155 heating systems will be installed in the third fiscal quarter of 2022.