Senegal and U.S. partner to host military medical readiness exercise
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Medical professionals from the Senegalese Armed forces and U.S. Army 44th Medical Brigade perform hip replacement surgery on a Senegalese patient during MEDREX Senegal 22-1 in Dakar, Senegal. The team of 16 medical professionals from the 44th Medical Brigade, Fort Bragg, N.C., working with Senegal Armed Force members at Quakam Military Hospital Jan. 24 to Feb. 11, 2022, is scheduled to perform a wide range of medical services over the three-week exercise. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Maj. Cain Claxton) VIEW ORIGINAL
Senegal and U.S. partner to host military medical readiness exercise
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army Capt. Kathleen Hartsell, an emergency department registered nurse, treats a Senegalese patient while her Senegalese Army counterpart assists during MEDREX Senegal 22-1 in Dakar, Senegal. Hartsell is part of a team of 16 medical professionals from the 44th Medical Brigade, Fort Bragg, N.C., working with Senegal Armed Force members at Quakam Military Hospital from 24 Jan. to 11 Feb. 2022. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Maj. Cain Claxton) VIEW ORIGINAL

DAKAR, Senegal – U.S. and Senegalese Armies started a three-week training exercise, MEDREX Senegal 22-1, at the Quakam Military Hospital to improve medical capabilities and readiness for military medical providers, January 24.

Participants are serving the patient community with a wide range of medical services from routine checkups to general and specialized surgeries.

This is the first of many medical readiness exercises in Africa scheduled for 2022 by U.S. Army Southern European Task Force, Africa. SETAF-AF coordinates each MEDREX with African militaries and stateside Army medical providers.

In Senegal, SETAF-AF organized a MEDREX for 44th Medical Brigade out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and Senegalese Armed Forces.

These exercises allow military medical personnel from the U.S. Army and African militaries to exchange medical practices, collaborate on shared interests, and strengthen treatment capabilities. The exercises expose participants to different medical delivery methods, and ultimately improve each participant’s capacity to assess and employ care.

These medical readiness exercises are in high demand by both African militaries and the U.S. Army medical community. Ultimately, these exercises are about making a difference for soldiers who deserve the best medical care available.

The team of Army and Senegalese medical counterparts are scheduled to perform a wide range of medical services at Quakam Military Hospital in Dakar during the 19-day exercise.