Detroit Arsenal leaders discuss Army modernization with Michigan Lieutenant Governor

By Donna EdwardsDecember 14, 2021

Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (2nd from right), commanding general U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, talks with Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist, Michigan, about the TACOM mission at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6.  Tammy Carnrike (2nd from left), civilian aide to the Secretary of the Army for Michigan, and Brig. Gen. Glenn Dean (left), program executive officer for Ground Combat Systems, listen to Werner's remarks.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (2nd from right), commanding general U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, talks with Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist, Michigan, about the TACOM mission at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6. Tammy Carnrike (2nd from left), civilian aide to the Secretary of the Army for Michigan, and Brig. Gen. Glenn Dean (left), program executive officer for Ground Combat Systems, listen to Werner's remarks. (Photo Credit: Scott Wakefield) VIEW ORIGINAL
Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (left), commanding general U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, hosts Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist (right), Michigan, at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6.  Werner discussed a wide range of topics with Gilchrist along with U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command-Ground Vehicle Systems Center, Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems, PEO-Combat Support and Combat Service Support, and Great Lakes Recruiting Battalion leadership.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (left), commanding general U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, hosts Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist (right), Michigan, at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6. Werner discussed a wide range of topics with Gilchrist along with U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command-Ground Vehicle Systems Center, Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems, PEO-Combat Support and Combat Service Support, and Great Lakes Recruiting Battalion leadership. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lt. Governor, Garlin Gilchrist (right), Michigan, listens to a wide variety of topics from Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (left), U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6.  Other Detroit Arsenal tenant organizations also had the opportunity to brief Gilchrist on their specific mission.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Lt. Governor, Garlin Gilchrist (right), Michigan, listens to a wide variety of topics from Maj. Gen. Darren Werner (left), U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command at the Detroit Arsenal Dec. 6. Other Detroit Arsenal tenant organizations also had the opportunity to brief Gilchrist on their specific mission. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

DETROIT ARSENAL, Mich. — Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist used a meeting at the Detroit Arsenal (DTA) on Monday, December 6, as a way to better understand the DTA’s impact on the state, Michigan’s economy and the Army.

Leaders from DTA organizations spent two hours talking with the lieutenant governor about the work of the various organizations and how they contribute to national defense.

Maj. Gen. Darren Werner, commanding general, U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command said that, during the meeting, the lieutenant governor was able to learn about some of the Army’s priorities and the ways in which the state could not only help veterans returning to Michigan, but also partner with the Army to update the skills of its current workforce.

“Wherever we can, we want to leverage the local community colleges as well as universities in the local area to elevate our workforce and develop a strategy where we can work with the state of Michigan,” said Werner.

Werner continued, “Another area where we want to be the best in the country is advanced manufacturing, and the technology that we develop across the auto industry and defense sector ensures that we have the training, which leads us to be able to bring our folks from Anniston, Alabama; Red River Army Depot, Texas; and Watervliet, New York, here for training and onboarding, which will give us the capability to have well-trained individuals all around the country.”

Werner also spoke about the relationship the Detroit Arsenal has with the local community and how joining the Army is a great opportunity for high school students.

Maj. Stefan Wilson, executive officer, Great Lakes Recruiting Battalion, provided the lieutenant governor with information about the Army’s Partnership for Youth Success (PaYS) program, which currently partners with twenty-eight organizations in Michigan to provide Soldiers separating from the Army with an opportunity to have an interview with one of the participating companies.

Gilchrist asked the group about credentialing, because the skills described by Werner and Wilson, which included automotive maintenance and information technology, showed that Soldiers have the skills, discipline and commitment to be a valuable part of companies in Michigan.

Gilchrist added, “Given what you are describing, there is an amazing amount of training that is offered by the Army. These skills are very, very important to the state and highly transferable. Has there been any talk on credentialing and additional certifications? This allows our employers to be able to see what skills an individual would be able to deliver to that organization.”

Werner replied that credentialing for military members is moving forward in certain areas at different rates of speed and “there is a really important element associated with that.” He added that, in his experience, every state is a little different.

Wilson was followed by Michael Cadieux, director, U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, Ground Vehicle Systems Center, who talked about the work that GVSC does in partnership with other organizations on the arsenal.

Cadieux highlighted the agreement that GVSC has with the state at Camp Grayling to do vehicle testing. He said, “There are tremendous capabilities at Grayling, and we continue to explore those opportunities.”

Brig. Gen. Glenn Dean, program executive officer for Ground Combat Systems, gave an overview of the PEO’s operations and outlook for the future. He stated that all of the work the Army has been doing over the years was finally coming together. “We are key to the Army’s modernization priorities. We are delivering the latest generation of those platforms right now. The bulk of the investment that the Army made in modernization over the past decade is all coming to fruition,” Dean explained. He ended by saying, “Our future is now.”

Kevin McEnery, deputy director, Next Generation Combat Vehicle Cross Functional Team, added that the CFT is in Detroit because “this is where the talent is — those skills and capabilities that are unique to ground combat vehicles exist here.” He continued by saying the CFT works along four lines of effort: “discovery, momentum, operational experimentation and delivery.”

Shane Fullmer, acting deputy program executive officer for PEO Combat Support and Combat Service Support, rounded out the meeting by explaining the expansive portfolio managed by the organization. “My PEO does all the stuff that keeps the Army moving,” he said.

Additionally, PEO CS&CSS is working with Michigan companies to address different vehicle issues. In fact, according to Werner, the PEO just completed one of the most rapid acquisition programs in Army history for the Infantry Squad Vehicle (ISV) with General Motors Defense.

The meeting ended with a brief tour of the GVSC facility, during which the lieutenant governor was able to see some of the vehicles up close, and with a promise by DTA leaders and the lieutenant governor that they will follow up on the issues discussed.