MICC commanding general outlines first line of effort
In his latest video, Brig. Gen. Doug Lowrey discusses the first line of effort, Action People First, with, from left, Paul Trier, Letty Walsh and Gerardo Lebron Dec. 7 at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The line of effort supports four key imperatives to the Mission and Installation Contracting Command’s organizational success as part of his commander’s intent. Lowrey is the MICC commanding general and Trier, Walsh and Lebron are assigned to the MICC headquarters personnel directorate. (Photo Credit: Illustration) VIEW ORIGINAL

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (Dec. 10, 2021) -- The commanding general for the Mission and Installation Contracting Command released this week his latest video in a series outlining the first of four lines of effort his commander’s intent.

Related video: MICC Line of Effort 1 - Action People First

Brig. Gen. Doug Lowrey identified Action People First as the first line of effort supporting four key imperatives to the MICC’s organizational success that recognizes Soldiers, civilian employees and their families as the command’s most trusted resource requiring innovative ways to sustain an organizational culture of winning.

“Through these initiatives, the MICC delivers the power of Army contracting within the continental United States strategic support area for Army forces to ensure a globally dominant land force capability,” Lowrey said earlier this fall when introducing his priorities to the workforce.

MICC commanding general outlines first line of effort
Action People First as the first line of effort supporting four key imperatives to the Mission and Installation Contracting Command's organizational success that recognizes Soldiers, civilian employees and their families as the command’s most trusted resource requiring innovative ways to sustain an organizational culture of winning. (Photo Credit: Graphic by Daniel P. Elkins) VIEW ORIGINAL

The first line of effort focuses on four initiatives including the following:

  • People First Think Tanks involves each MICC unit establishing a “People First” think tank to identify findings and then act on those findings to truly make the command a “People First” organization.
  • Future Work Environment asks each MICC organization to define the future work environment in terms of where it is and what it looks like to ensure it has the appropriate structure, processes and tools to excel.
  • Resource and Staff for Tomorrow ensures the workforce is postured for future challenges with the right people and means to accomplish the MICC mission.
  • Ready Army Civilian and Leaders focuses on the Army Materiel Command initiative on preparing the workforce for the future taking into account a whole person concept, which includes workforce development and the Back-to-Basics acquisition workforce framework.

MICC commanding general outlines first line of effort
Underpinning the commander’s intent by Brig. Gen. Doug Lowrey are four key imperatives to Mission and Installation Contracting Command organizational success. Those include a positive work environment, forging relationships, inspiring ownership and a culture of living the legacy, which align MICC efforts with Army, Army Materiel Command and Army Contracting Command priorities. Lowrey is the MICC commanding general. (Photo Credit: Graphic by Daniel P. Elkins) VIEW ORIGINAL

The first line of effort reinforces the commanding general’s keys to success that include a positive work environment, forging relationships, inspiring ownership and a culture of living the legacy. Those keys serve to align MICC efforts with Army, AMC and Army Contracting Command priorities.

The commanding general will continue outlining the three remaining lines of effort in the coming months.

About the MICC:

Headquartered at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Mission and Installation Contracting Command consists of about 1,300 military and civilian members who are responsible for contracting goods and services in support of Soldiers as well as readying trained contracting units for the operating force and contingency environment when called upon. MICC contracts are vital in feeding more than 200,000 Soldiers every day, providing many daily base operations support services at installations, facilitate training in the preparation of more than 100,000 conventional force members annually, training more than 500,000 students each year, and maintaining more than 14.4 million acres of land and 170,000 structures.