The Fort Leonard Wood Fire Department recommends checking smoke alarms each year when daylight saving time ends. In addition to making sure batteries are still functioning, it’s important to note the manufacturing date of smoke alarms. Replace alarms that are more than 10 years old.
The Fort Leonard Wood Fire Department recommends checking smoke alarms each year when daylight saving time ends. In addition to making sure batteries are still functioning, it’s important to note the manufacturing date of smoke alarms. Replace alarms that are more than 10 years old. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — When daylight saving time comes to an end, it’s time to test smoke alarms again.

As the fall season ushers in cold weather, it also increases the risk of deadly home fires. That’s because heating equipment is the second-most common cause of fatalities from home fires, which, on average, take seven lives every day in the U.S., according to the National Fire Protection Association. However, having functioning smoke alarms can double a person’s odds of survival.

We want everyone to stay safe this winter. Take some time to test and change the batteries in your smoke alarms to protect you and your family against the season’s life-threatening risk of home fires before going to sleep on Nov. 6. Daylight saving time ends this year at 2 a.m. on Nov. 7.

The Fort Leonard Wood Fire Department asks everyone to take these simple steps:

  • Check smoke alarm batteries. When turning the clocks back, take a few minutes to replace the smoke alarm batteries if needed and push the test button to make sure the alarms are working. It’s also a great time to check carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Check the manufacturing date of your smoke alarm. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, most alarms have a life span of about 10 years. After this time, the entire unit should be replaced. Most alarms have the date of manufacture inside the unit. We recommend you write the expiration date on the outside of the unit to serve as a quick reminder.
  • Install smoke alarms. If you don’t have working smoke alarms, install them. At a minimum, put one on every level of the home and inside bedrooms.
  • Practice an escape plan. Make sure everyone in the household knows two ways to get out of every room and how to get out of the home in less than two minutes.

For more fire safety tips, call the Fire Prevention Section at 573.596.0886.