Kenneth Crowe is an Air Force veteran who served 24 years in uniform. He is now a U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command security specialist.
Kenneth Crowe is an Air Force veteran who served 24 years in uniform. He is now a U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command security specialist. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photos) VIEW ORIGINAL

Following in the legacy of his father, Kenneth Crowe served in the Air Force for 24 years, eventually becoming a commissioned officer during the second half of his career.

Crowe, a U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command security specialist, joined the Air Force in 1986 as an enlisted airman.

“[For the] first 14 years, I was an inflight refueling specialist,” said Crowe. “In January 2000, I commissioned and became an air traffic control officer.”

“My dad was in the Air Force for 20 years,” said Crowe.  “I suppose I just always knew I would follow in his footsteps.”

During his time in the Air Force, Crowe deployed to several locations including England, Iceland, Panama, Saudi Arabia, Bosnia and Afghanistan.

Over the span of his career, Crowe said there are a few experiences that he categorizes as highlights. He has had so many great times that it’s difficult to choose just one.

“I suppose my No. 1 would be as a military leader; you have so many opportunities to mold, mentor and motivate,” said Crowe. “Seeing former subordinates go on to get commissioned through Officer Training School and the Air Force Academy or rise through the ranks, exceeding their own early expectations, makes me smile when I look back on it.”

Another one of Crowe’s highlights was serving in a NATO unit while deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan.

After retiring in 2010, Crowe was hired to work as the unit security manager in the Special Operations Air Refueling Office at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. Eight years later, he joined AMCOM and began working in his current position.

According to Crowe, the military taught him to adapt and critical thinking.

“Often, we encounter things we’ve never experienced before and these skills have helped me figure it out, roll up my sleeves and get the mission done,” said Crowe.

As a civil servant, Crowe continues to serve his country and states he can’t imagine working anywhere else.

“When I was [on] active duty, I woke up every day eager to go to work and accomplish the mission,” said Crowe. “Like when I was active duty, as a civil servant, I feel like I’m a part of something bigger. I’m still in a position to take care of people who take care of the mission.”

Crowe’s two sons didn’t carry the family legacy of joining the Air Force; however, they have forged their own path and enlisted in the U.S. Army.