October 2021 Energy Action Month: Power To Win

By OASA IE&ESeptember 30, 2021

October 2021 - Energy Action Month
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – During Energy Action Month and throughout the year, we should all strive to improve energy resilience.

Army installations rely, with few exceptions, on commercial energy sources to accomplish critical missions. We need resilient installations that have assured access to energy and water for mission readiness and to be prepared for potential threats that could severely impact the Army mission, like the cyberattack on the Colonial Pipeline or the extreme weather during Hurricane Ida. Climate change is a direct threat to our Army. Some effects may be unavoidable, but with improved infrastructure and resilient installations, we can minimize impacts and maintain Army readiness. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
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J.E. “Jack” Surash, Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Army Installations, Energy, and  Environment; Edward M. Daly, General, Commanding General, Army Materiel Command;  Jason T. Evans, Lieutenant General, Deputy Chief of Staff, G-9 (Installations)
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – J.E. “Jack” Surash, Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Army Installations, Energy, and Environment; Edward M. Daly, General, Commanding General, Army Materiel Command; Jason T. Evans, Lieutenant General, Deputy Chief of Staff, G-9 (Installations)
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
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October is Energy Action Month, and this year’s theme, “Power to Win,” reinforces the importance of energy resilience, or uninterrupted access to energy, to Army readiness and supporting critical missions.

The Army is the largest consumer of installation energy in the DoD, spending more than $1 billion per year on facility energy. Our installations rely, with few exceptions, on commercial energy sources to accomplish critical missions. We need resilient installations to ensure our Soldiers are trained and ready to deploy, fight and win our Nation’s conflicts.

The Army Installations Strategy (AIS) is the foundational document that drives the Army’s goal for modernized, resilient, secure, and sustainable installations in support of the Ready Force of 2035. Following the AIS, the Army Installation Energy and Water Strategic Plan establishes resilience, efficiency, and affordability as strategic goals. It sets a vision, goals, strategic objectives, and measurable targets to shape efforts to achieve long-term infrastructure resilience, efficiency, and affordability.

We must remain vigilant in protecting our assets while improving our capabilities. Physical, natural, and cyber threats continue to jeopardize our installations and our energy infrastructure. We need to be prepared for potential threats that could severely impact the Army mission, like the cyberattack on the Colonial Pipeline or the extreme weather during Hurricane Ida.

The time to be resilient is now. We have established microgrid capability at U.S. Army Garrison Hawaii and Fort Drum, New York; and are pursuing microgrid capability for several other installations including Fort Benning, Georgia and Fort Rucker, Alabama. We have additional initiatives across the Army to improve installation energy resilience and enhance Army readiness.

During October, it is everyone’s responsibility to become energy aware and then apply that awareness throughout the year. By taking action and making informed energy decisions, we can ensure the Army has the Power to Win.

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Join the conversation on social media using #PowerToWin, #EAM2021, and #MissionCapable.

For Energy Action Month information and downloadable materials, visit: https://www.asaie.army.mil/Public/ES/energyactionmonth.html