Soldiers assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, pose for a group photo after a unit physical training session in honor of the staff changeover of the officer in charge of the brigade human resource office at Fort Stewart, Georgia, July 15, 2021. As opposed to the pomp and circumstance that surrounds a change of command, a staff changeover often goes unnoticed to individuals not directly affected by the office on a day-to-day basis and those outside the unit. (Courtesy photo)
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, pose for a group photo after a unit physical training session in honor of the staff changeover of the officer in charge of the brigade human resource office at Fort Stewart, Georgia, July 15, 2021. As opposed to the pomp and circumstance that surrounds a change of command, a staff changeover often goes unnoticed to individuals not directly affected by the office on a day-to-day basis and those outside the unit. (Courtesy photo) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, conduct a unit physical training session in honor of the staff changeover of the officer in charge of the brigade human resource office at Fort Stewart, Georgia, July 15, 2021. As opposed to the pomp and circumstance that surrounds a change of command, a staff changeover often goes unnoticed to individuals not directly affected by the office on a day-to-day basis and those outside the unit. (Courtesy photo)
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, conduct a unit physical training session in honor of the staff changeover of the officer in charge of the brigade human resource office at Fort Stewart, Georgia, July 15, 2021. As opposed to the pomp and circumstance that surrounds a change of command, a staff changeover often goes unnoticed to individuals not directly affected by the office on a day-to-day basis and those outside the unit. (Courtesy photo) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT STEWART, Ga. – The human resource office for 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, conducted an official leadership changeover from Maj. Chinyere Sturghill to Maj. Matthew King in July at Fort Stewart. As opposed to the pomp and circumstance that surrounds a change of command, a staff changeover often goes unnoticed to individuals not directly affected by the office on a day-to-day basis and those outside the unit. However, the importance of the changeover in the organization and the effect it has on Soldiers can be just as important.

“Staff changeovers involve the deliberate switch of leaders in staff positions. This switch of leaders may be from within or outside the organization,” said Sturghill. “It is significant because it highlights the anticipated transitions resident within the military. The transitions are necessary to leverage new talent and opportunities.”

The long-term effects of the change on the respective office and can affect the unit from top to bottom, which can also make it comparable with a change of command.

“Staff changeover impacts the organization in both big and small aspects by providing fresh approaches and updated procedures and processes,” said Master Sgt. Jeanne Samayo, the 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, human resource noncommissioned officer in charge. “These changes bring benefits to the Soldiers, their Families and the unit, which are important key elements to the organization as whole.”

The staff officers and NCOs in charge are normally in their position for one to two years and can have an enduring impact on the unit through the systems and culture they leave behind. The changeover between one officer or NCO in charge to the next is critical for seamless continuity in the day-to-day operations of the organization.

“The changeover process allows the outgoing leader to introduce external stakeholders and key influencers to their replacement, which also assists the incoming leader in their understanding of the environment,” said King. “Staff sections are measured by their ability to provide accurate information in a timely and responsive manner to anticipate requirements while integrating and nesting within an organization's priorities. A proper transition process allows for staff sections to remain responsive, integrated, and effective.”