ANNISTON MUNITIONS CENTER, Ala. -- Anniston Munitions Center opened its doors in support of Army Reserve who were conducting annual training requirements. What started in June and will continue through the summer, provides the soldiers an opportunity to hone their skills with real-world training.

266th Ordnance Company from Aguadilla, Puerto Rico was on the installation in July. Working alongside ANMC personnel, the soldiers were eager to master their craft.

“Our intent is for the younger soldiers to understand the worldwide mission and learn to do their job safely,” said 1st Sgt. Carlos Barreto.

The 266th moved and disposed of munitions, palletized and packaged munitions and operated forklifts. Pfc. Malquiel Perez spoke about the ability to use their military occupational specialty training in a real-world mission setting. “We can do everything we are trained to do, to include stenciling, packaging, banding, driving forklifts,” he said. “All in one place.”

In addition to using their MOS, the soldiers were appreciative of the hospitality, patience and instruction shown by ANMC workforce. “Working side by side with civilians who are welcoming, informative and helpful has been refreshing,” said Spc. Veronica Rodriguez. “Same jobs but different procedures.”

The unit includes ammunition stock control and accounting specialists, who maintain and manage the administrative aspects of the company. Sgt. Neisha Mantilla is one of them and addressed the importance of learning the civilian version of the inventory system. “The administrative program ANMC workforce use is the Logistics Modernization Program,” she said. “In the Army, we use standard Army ammunition system-modernization, or SAAS-MOD and being able to use our MOS allows us to learn LMP and assimilate to the new system.”

In the coming weeks, the mission cooperation between the 266th and ANMC will come to an end. 1st Sgt. Carlos Barreto spoke about the feedback he received from ANMC staff, “I have received positive feedback from each of our work sites in the process, " he said. "

Spc. Veronica Rodriguez operates a heavy duty forklift by placing a container on wooden beams to help prevent moisture from causing rust on the bottom of the container.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Veronica Rodriguez operates a heavy duty forklift by placing a container on wooden beams to help prevent moisture from causing rust on the bottom of the container. (Photo Credit: US Army Photo by Mark Cleghorn) VIEW ORIGINAL
Brig. Gen. Jeffrey W. Jurasek (right) observes Spc. Diego Torres (center) and Spc. Glissette Fox (left) inventory munitions using a radio frequency device.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Brig. Gen. Jeffrey W. Jurasek (right) observes Spc. Diego Torres (center) and Spc. Glissette Fox (left) inventory munitions using a radio frequency device. (Photo Credit: US Army Photo by Mark Cleghorn) VIEW ORIGINAL
Spc. Ederick Felicianomaldonado (left) and Spc. Baldy Fonrodonaaubert (right) use trailer winch straps to secure munitions to the flatbed trailer prior to transport.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Ederick Felicianomaldonado (left) and Spc. Baldy Fonrodonaaubert (right) use trailer winch straps to secure munitions to the flatbed trailer prior to transport. (Photo Credit: US Army Photo by Mark Cleghorn) VIEW ORIGINAL
Sgt. Enrique Rosadomontero of the 266th Ordnance Company spots a forklift driver approaching palletized munitions.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. Enrique Rosadomontero of the 266th Ordnance Company spots a forklift driver approaching palletized munitions. (Photo Credit: US Army Photo by Mark Cleghorn) VIEW ORIGINAL
Spc. Baldy Fonrodonaaubert tightens a trailer winch strap to secure munitions cargo for transport.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Baldy Fonrodonaaubert tightens a trailer winch strap to secure munitions cargo for transport. (Photo Credit: US Army Photo by Mark Cleghorn) VIEW ORIGINAL

I am glad we are successfully supporting ANMC and its mission while training.”

Anniston Munitions Center is a tenant organization located on Anniston Army Depot property. The Joint Munitions Command, whose mission is to provide the joint force with ready, reliable, lethal munitions at the speed of war sustaining global readiness, is their parent command.