FORT CAMPBELL, Ky.—Soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) prepare for their upcoming Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise in conjunction with their rotation at the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, Louisiana.

Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) stage their vehicles onto the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th as they prepare to ship them out to Port Charleston, S.C. for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise. The SEDRE concept includes an alert procedure, deployment of unit equipment and personnel, and upload and offload of a brigade-sized task force, using port facilities and ships.
Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) stage their vehicles onto the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th as they prepare to ship them out to Port Charleston, S.C. for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise. The SEDRE concept includes an alert procedure, deployment of unit equipment and personnel, and upload and offload of a brigade-sized task force, using port facilities and ships. (Photo Credit: (U.S. Army photos by Spc. Jacob Wachob, 40th Public Affairs Detachment) ) VIEW ORIGINAL

This SEDRE is not in response to any international situation or diplomatic conversation. This SEDRE is part of a U.S. Army program and has been in the planning phases since March 2021.

This exercise provides the unit an opportunity to exercise the procedures associated with recalling unit members, preparing personnel and equipment for deployment, deploying, and planning and conducting a mission.

“This is the first time that the majority of our Soldiers will be executing a SEDRE, and it’s a very exciting opportunity for our Soldiers to hone in on an additional capability to win the fight,” said Sgt. 1st Class Jerome Gardner, the noncommissioned officer in charge for Forward Support Company, 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd BCT, 101 Abn. Div. “It’s not very common that we utilize sea vessels, in my 18-years in the Army this is my first SEDRE too, but the units have been making it happen, there’s a lot of cohesion right now and it’s exciting to see a full scale operation like this executed.”

The balance between readiness and health protection conditions is critical to 101 Abn. Div. success. They have developed and implemented safety-mitigation measures. They set conditions to expand capacity to stop the spread of the virus, while training their soldiers to fight and win in contested environments.

Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) conduct inventory of the container express boxes at the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th, as they prepare to ship them out to Port Charleston, S.C. for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise.  SEDRE’S provide critical training to units routinely deployed in contingency operations. The objective of a SEDRE is to train units in standard deployment procedures. The SEDRE concept includes an alert procedure, deployment of unit equipment and personnel, and upload and offload of a brigade-sized task force, using port facilities and ships. . (U.S. Army photos by Spc. Jacob Wachob, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)
Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) conduct inventory of the container express boxes at the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th, as they prepare to ship them out to Port Charleston, S.C. for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise. SEDRE’S provide critical training to units routinely deployed in contingency operations. The objective of a SEDRE is to train units in standard deployment procedures. The SEDRE concept includes an alert procedure, deployment of unit equipment and personnel, and upload and offload of a brigade-sized task force, using port facilities and ships. . (U.S. Army photos by Spc. Jacob Wachob, 40th Public Affairs Detachment) (Photo Credit: (U.S. Army photos by Spc. Jacob Wachob, 40th Public Affairs Detachment) ) VIEW ORIGINAL

Phase one of the operation required Soldiers to stage the vehicles and equipment necessary for the mission at the Fort Campbell Railhead where it will then be transported to the Port of Charleston, where it will be put on the a barge, and then convoyed to JRTC, where 3rd Brigade will begin their training rotation.

“The SEDRE has forced us to adapt to win, despite the short notice and sometimes scramble for information, we’re making this happen, and we will succeed,” said 1st. Lt. Rainer Eldred, the executive officer for Forward Support Company, 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd BCT, 101 Abn. Div. “Short notice or no notice deployment exercises definitely cause us to examine the areas that need to be strengthened in our ability to rapidly move and ship out, but it is all part of the process of building upon the lethality of the 101st.”

The objective of a SEDRE is to train units in standard deployment procedures. The SEDRE concept requires the deployment of an entire brigade’s equipment and personnel. The equipment and vehicles must be uploaded and offloaded using port facilities and ships.

Challenging training events like deployment readiness exercises is to strengthen unit cohesion, improve tactical proficiency and allow the army to develop agile, adaptive leaders of character.

Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) transport fuel containers onto the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th in preparation for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise. SEDRE’s provide Soldiers the opportunity to hone in on an additional capability to win the fight.
Soldiers assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) transport fuel containers onto the Fort Campbell Railhead August 10th in preparation for their Sea Emergency Deployment Readiness Training Exercise. SEDRE’s provide Soldiers the opportunity to hone in on an additional capability to win the fight. (Photo Credit: (U.S. Army photos by Spc. Jacob Wachob, 40th Public Affairs Detachment) ) VIEW ORIGINAL