Lt. Gen. Leslie Smith, Army Inspector General, speaks with Fort Leonard Wood senior leaders during a professional development event June 24 at Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Smith visited the installation last week to host listening sessions and professional development events, and visit with key garrison and Maneuver Support Center of Excellence leaders.
Lt. Gen. Leslie Smith, Army Inspector General, speaks with Fort Leonard Wood senior leaders during a professional development event June 24 at Lincoln Hall Auditorium. Smith visited the installation last week to host listening sessions and professional development events, and visit with key garrison and Maneuver Support Center of Excellence leaders. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — “Your development has gotten you to this point — how do you get others to this point as well?”

That was one of many questions Lt. Gen. Leslie Smith, Army Inspector General, asked of Fort Leonard Wood senior leaders during a leader professional development event he hosted June 24 at Lincoln Hall Auditorium.

In addition to that opportunity, Smith also conducted a series of listening sessions and met with key garrison and Maneuver Support Center of Excellence leaders during his two-day visit.

Smith was also the guest speaker at the U.S. Army Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear School’s Green Dragon Ball Friday at Nutter Field House — the closing event of this year’s Army Chemical Corps Regimental Week. Smith is a former 3rd Chemical Brigade commander and was the 25th USACBRNS commandant from 2008 to 2010.

During his LPD event, Smith provided many pieces of wisdom from his 30-plus year Army career.

“Don’t take your job so seriously that you’re uptight,” he said, adding, “People are looking to see how you’ll react when something happens — demonstrate what we expect.”

In response to a question regarding the Fort Hood Independent Review — commonly called the Fort Hood Report — a three-month examination of the command climate and culture at Fort Hood, Texas, and the surrounding military community, Smith said the Army is increasing the size and number of surveys being conducted to look for more feedback.

“The Army has learned a lot about engaged leadership,” he said. “Keep your finger on the pulse — not literally.”

In line with feedback, Smith’s listening sessions engaged specific groups of service members and Army civilians here, including company and battalion commanders, sexual assault response coordinators, women and a demographic-focused session for people who identify as American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.