Grevel (center) pictured with two sons outside Beaumont Army Hospital, El Paso, TX.
1 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Grevel (center) pictured with two sons outside Beaumont Army Hospital, El Paso, TX. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
SFC Grevel pictured next to captured Russian ZPU-4, “anti-aircraft machine gun mount” based on the Soviet 14.5 x 114mm KPV heavy machine gun; Village of An Nasiriyah.
2 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – SFC Grevel pictured next to captured Russian ZPU-4, “anti-aircraft machine gun mount” based on the Soviet 14.5 x 114mm KPV heavy machine gun; Village of An Nasiriyah. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
SFC Wilhelm Grevel being awarded the Bronze Star Medal by Brigadier General Howard B. Bromberg of 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC), in Ahmad al-Jaber Air Base, Kuwait – June 2003.
3 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – SFC Wilhelm Grevel being awarded the Bronze Star Medal by Brigadier General Howard B. Bromberg of 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC), in Ahmad al-Jaber Air Base, Kuwait – June 2003. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Herbornseelbach: Last mission in Germany, before closing out - Operation Silent Echo; the removal of all Special Weapons from Germany to CONUS – Early 1992 during the Cold War period/era.  Unit: 96th Ordnance Company, 557th USAFAD, 59th Ordnance Brigade  The Berlin Wall came down and all soldiers (approximately 67) holding the 55G MOS (Nuclear Weapons Specialist) were re-classed to other MOSs’ to accommodate the needs of the Army.
4 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Herbornseelbach: Last mission in Germany, before closing out - Operation Silent Echo; the removal of all Special Weapons from Germany to CONUS – Early 1992 during the Cold War period/era. Unit: 96th Ordnance Company, 557th USAFAD, 59th Ordnance Brigade The Berlin Wall came down and all soldiers (approximately 67) holding the 55G MOS (Nuclear Weapons Specialist) were re-classed to other MOSs’ to accommodate the needs of the Army. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers of the 108th HHB.  SFC Grevel far left.
5 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers of the 108th HHB. SFC Grevel far left. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers of the HHB 108th Brigade Air Defense Artillery (ADA) LOGPAX Security
Team charged up in Kuwait before heading up north to provide security to two flatbeds containing supplies for the Patriot missile system during OEF/OIF - 2003
6 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers of the HHB 108th Brigade Air Defense Artillery (ADA) LOGPAX Security
Team charged up in Kuwait before heading up north to provide security to two flatbeds containing supplies for the Patriot missile system during OEF/OIF - 2003
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
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Roxenya Wilhelmina Grevel is a 68P (Radiology Specialist) and stationed in Hawaii - Tripler Army Medical Center. She is now a Staff Sergeant.
7 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Roxenya Wilhelmina Grevel is a 68P (Radiology Specialist) and stationed in Hawaii - Tripler Army Medical Center. She is now a Staff Sergeant. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
WO1 William David Grevel standing - front and center, awaiting his Commander to promote him to CW2 in Camp Hohenfels, Germany. His sister – Aylamarie Grevel, standing behind him, is a QASAS assigned to the Hohenfels Ammunition Supply Point under the 21st TSC, Kaiserslautern, Germany. She help pin her brother during his promotion.
8 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – WO1 William David Grevel standing - front and center, awaiting his Commander to promote him to CW2 in Camp Hohenfels, Germany. His sister – Aylamarie Grevel, standing behind him, is a QASAS assigned to the Hohenfels Ammunition Supply Point under the 21st TSC, Kaiserslautern, Germany. She help pin her brother during his promotion. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Grevel and wife Lupe welcoming four children home from around the world.
9 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Grevel and wife Lupe welcoming four children home from around the world. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

Wilhelm Grevel was born in Utulei, American Samoa, in 1956. Growing up in Samoa, Grevel was raised in a family that reflected Army values. He attended Washington State University (WSU), Pullman, Washington, on a scholarship from the government of Samoa, graduating with a B.A. in Economics. He married his wife, Lupe, in 1983 and, in 1987, enlisted in the Army as a Nuclear Weapons Specialist (55G) and served with the 96th Ordnance Company, 557th USAFAD, 59th Ordnance Brigade, in Herborn-Seelbach, Germany.

“Our life in Germany was undoubtedly very stressful,” Grevel noted. “My wife and family did not know what I was doing on a daily basis. Of course I was aware of the risk, but she hung in there with me. That is why I give her the credit for the success of our children. She was there for the kids while I tended to the mission.”

Grevel reenlisted twice while in Germany, in dedication to the Army mission. He would serve there until the Berlin Wall fell, signaling an end to the Cold War and a necessary realignment of mission.

“Sometimes I wish the Berlin Wall hadn’t come down. Otherwise, I would have retired in Germany. We did not lose our jobs entirely. The Department of the Army sent a team down to Giessen and gave us new assignments (new MOSs) thus securing our future moving forward. I was one of 68 soldiers reclassified to 27X – Patriot Missile System Repairer.”

This team went to Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama for technical school before finally settling in Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas – home of the Patriot Missile system. There, he attended Webster University, graduating with an M.A. in Management Leadership, while working as an electronics tech for radar and launchers. He served this role throughout his 20-year career in active service, including a deployment to Iraq.

Grevel began his Civilian service as an Ammunitions Manager Intern and, in 2011, swore a new oath to serve the United States in this capacity. He would go on to work in the Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE) program for 4 years and with the Munition Items Disposition Action System (MIDAS) for over 5 years.

“Working as an Army Civilian gave me a chance to continue to serve after retiring,” said Grevel. “I’m passionate about the U.S. Army. “I love to share and teach what I've learned throughout my journey. I want to pass on my expertise to younger, newer folks who are keen to learn. They represent the future of our organization: the greatest Army in the world.”

His commitment is reflected in the plans and accomplishments of his four children, all of whom serve in, or work for, the Army.

“The Army has been good to me and my family. I am passionate in learning my craft and willing to share what I learn to my teammates. My moral compass throughout my career in the Army has been: Duty, Honor, Country. Throughout, I’ve been guided by the Army Values: Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage. With these, you can’t go wrong.”

Once a Soldier. Always a Soldier. Soldier For Life!