Drivers caught going 20 mph over the posted speed limit will be issued a driving privilege suspension letter and could have their on-post driving privileges revoked for 14 calendar days.
Drivers caught going 20 mph over the posted speed limit will be issued a driving privilege suspension letter and could have their on-post driving privileges revoked for 14 calendar days. (Photo Credit: Photo by Brian Hill) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — Drivers have one more reason to think again when considering speeding on post, as Fort Leonard Wood officials are now enforcing an on-post driving suspension for certain offenses, directed by Maj. Gen. James Bonner, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence and Fort Leonard Wood commanding general.

Anyone caught driving 20 mph over the posted speed limit will be issued an installation driving privilege suspension letter and will have driving privileges on Fort Leonard Wood revoked for 14 calendar days from the date of the letter.

However, according to Lt. Col. Nic Birch, Directorate of Emergency Services director and Provost Marshal, these drivers will have the opportunity to request a hearing, which is conducted by a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney.

Army Regulation 190-5, Motor Vehicle Traffic Supervision, details the due process requirements for suspensions.

“For offenses other than intoxicated driving, suspension or revocation of the installation driving privilege will not become effective until the installation commander or designee notifies the affected person and offers that person an administrative hearing,” it reads.

Birch said the suspension will be delayed for individuals who request a hearing.

“This request will delay the pending suspension for 14 calendar days,” he said.

Birch said most of the speeding on post is in the 20 mph housing areas and near the west and north gates, where the posted speed limit drops to 25 mph to make it easier for drivers to stop should the safety bollards need to be raised.

“There is little to gain by speeding,” Birch said. “Most situations could be resolved by departing earlier — the time saved by speeding fails to outweigh the increased risks.”