In February 2021, 1st Lt. Andrew Schwartz, physical therapist at the Fort Bragg Soldier Recovery Unit, North Carolina, (left) led a stretching exercise with SRU Soldiers and cadre. (Photo courtesy of Dean Bissey)
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – In February 2021, 1st Lt. Andrew Schwartz, physical therapist at the Fort Bragg Soldier Recovery Unit, North Carolina, (left) led a stretching exercise with SRU Soldiers and cadre. (Photo courtesy of Dean Bissey) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
In February 2021, Soldiers and cadre participated in a stretching exercise led by 1st Lt. Andrew Schwartz, physical therapist at the Fort Bragg Soldier Recovery Unit, North Carolina (center front.) (Photo courtesy of Dean Bissey)
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – In February 2021, Soldiers and cadre participated in a stretching exercise led by 1st Lt. Andrew Schwartz, physical therapist at the Fort Bragg Soldier Recovery Unit, North Carolina (center front.) (Photo courtesy of Dean Bissey) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

ARLINGTON, Va. – The strength training class at the Fort Bragg Soldier Recovery Unit in North Carolina was meant to provide recovering Soldiers with fitness instruction, but it may also be boosting their spirits.

“I tell anyone that anything that will increase your strength and resiliency will help and improve your overall feeling and confidence,” said Dean Bissey, adaptive reconditioning support specialist at the Fort Bragg SRU.

The SRU is home to an adaptive reconditioning program that helps wounded, ill and injured Soldiers achieve goals and return to active lifestyles. It’s part of the Army Recovery Care Program, which helps them transition back to duty or to veteran status.

Physical therapist, 1st Lt. Andrew Schwartz, leads the strength training class. Participants are taught safe and correct lifting mechanics so they can adapt movements when necessary, in addition to improving and lifting more weight, Bissey explained. The methods and information decrease their likelihood of injury or reinjury from performing lifts or movements incorrectly, he said.

The class has other benefits too.

“I like the strength training program because it is one of the classes that has the ability to disprove many preconceived thoughts and boundaries a wounded, injured or ill Soldier may have or has been previously told,” Bissey said.

He considers the class invaluable for participants who incorporate weightlifting into their conditioning programs. They will carry this education with them when they transition, he said.