The Fort Knox Directorate of Emergency Services partners with Hardin County Water District No. 1 in simulated confined space rescue training May 21, 2021.
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The Fort Knox Directorate of Emergency Services partners with Hardin County Water District No. 1 in simulated confined space rescue training May 21, 2021.
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The Fort Knox Directorate of Emergency Services partners with Hardin County Water District No. 1 in simulated confined space rescue training May 21, 2021.
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The Fort Knox Directorate of Emergency Services partners with Hardin County Water District No. 1 in simulated confined space rescue training May 21, 2021.
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FORT KNOX, Ky. – An exercise took place on post today that was designed to help Fort Knox emergency responders hone their skills with confined space rescues.

The training was conducted in partnership with Hardin County Water District No. 1, which manages the post’s water and whose staff must sometimes operate in small spaces to perform maintenance and repair work.

Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment. (Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News) VIEW ORIGINAL
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Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment.
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Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment.
(Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News)
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Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Two Fort Knox firefighters work together within an open manhole to extract the “victim,” while others remain above ground to operate the rescue equipment. (Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News) VIEW ORIGINAL

“Since we’re the primary rescue team, I thought it would good to get together,” said Jacob Geer, assistant training chief with the Fort Knox Directorate of Emergency Services. “They reached out to us on training with them.”

The simulated rescue took about 45 minutes to complete, well within what Geer referred to as “the golden hour.” He said the phrase refers to the goal to have a victim on the way to receiving professional medical care within an hour of receiving the emergency call.

Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue. (Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News) VIEW ORIGINAL
Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue. (Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News) VIEW ORIGINAL
Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Once the “victim” was successfully extracted, the two rescue workers remove their masks and breathe fresh air again as ambulance workers completed their portion of the simulated rescue. (Photo Credit: Jenn DeHaan, Fort Knox News) VIEW ORIGINAL

Geer said this training was unique because emergency workers had the opportunity to train in a different setting, and it allowed Hardin County Water District No. 1 to see how rescue procedures operate firsthand.