Gold Star Spouse Nancy Jacobs and daughter Kristy Drews observe the memorial plaque placed outside Bryan-Vogt Hall, April 22 on Fort Stewart.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Gold Star Spouse Nancy Jacobs and daughter Kristy Drews observe the memorial plaque placed outside Bryan-Vogt Hall, April 22 on Fort Stewart. (Photo Credit: Molly Cooke) VIEW ORIGINAL
Gold Star Spouse Nancy Jacobs and daughter Kristy Drews pose next to the memorial plaque placed outside Bryan-Vogt Hall, April 22 on Fort Stewart. The building was erected and dedicated in 1979 in honor of Jacobs’ late husband, Chief Warrant Officer Robert A. Vogt, 24th Combat Intelligence Company, 24th Infantry Division.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Gold Star Spouse Nancy Jacobs and daughter Kristy Drews pose next to the memorial plaque placed outside Bryan-Vogt Hall, April 22 on Fort Stewart. The building was erected and dedicated in 1979 in honor of Jacobs’ late husband, Chief Warrant Officer Robert A. Vogt, 24th Combat Intelligence Company, 24th Infantry Division. (Photo Credit: Molly Cooke) VIEW ORIGINAL

An echo of Fort Stewart’s history was heard last week when a Gold Star Spouse and her children visited a building dedicated to her late husband on April 22.

Nancy Jacobs, daughter Kristy Drews, and son Matthew Jacobs visited Bryan-Vogt Hall here. The building was erected and dedicated in 1979 and is now part of the IHG Hotel.

The building is dedicated to Jacobs’ late husband, Chief Warrant Officer Robert A. Vogt, 24th Combat Intelligence Company, 24th Infantry Division.

Vogt died Sept. 14, 1977 when the Air Force plane he was in crashed near Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, during a Ranger training exercise. Maj. James E. Bryan, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, also died in the crash. The IHG building is named in their honor.

Jacobs said she was pleased the building dedicated to her husband still stands on Fort Stewart and will continue to do so.

“I think from the first time when they told me that they were going to do this—they asked my permission--I was very happy about that,” Jacobs said.

This was the family’s first time back to the installation since they left after the accident. Drews remembers the emotions she felt more than the place.

“I don’t’ really remember living on base that much because I was 8 when I left,” she said. “I was still really sad.”

Jacobs recalled details about her late husband, awards he earned in Vietnam, his dedication, and his fearlessness.

“He was a brave man,” Jacobs said. “He would have been fine with giving his life for his country. He was an Army man. A country man. And we’re proud of him.”