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1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cameron University Army ROTC cadets Moises Jaime and Jonathan Gallo crawl over logs in the belly robber station at the Confidence Obstacle Course April 6, 2021, at Fort Sill. Cadet Joseph Hilliard, center, waits his turn. The cadets were training with E Battery, 1st Battalion, 79th Field Artillery drill sergeants to prepare themselves for airborne, and air assault training this summer. (Photo Credit: Fort Sill Tribune staff) VIEW ORIGINAL
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2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cadets Joseph Hilliard (foreground) and Joel Vann go through the Tarzan station April 6, 2021, at the 1st Sgt. Forrest Peden Confidence Obstacle Course at Fort Sill. The cadets went through 12 stations with drill sergeants from E Battery, 1st Battalion, 79th Field Artillery. (Photo Credit: Fort Sill Tribune) VIEW ORIGINAL
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3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – 1st Lt. Christopher Lacock, E/1-79th FA platoon leader (foreground), leads Cameron University ROTC cadets through the six vaults station at the obstacle course April 6, 2021, at Fort Sill. Lacock's basic combat training battery went through the course with the cadets. (Photo Credit: Fort Sill Tribune) VIEW ORIGINAL
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4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Staff Sgt. Chris Walton, Headquarters and Headquarters Section, 434th Field Artillery Brigade, monitors the progress of ROTC Cadet Joseph Hilliard April 6, 2021, on a climbing obstacle. (Photo Credit: Fort Sill Tribune staff) VIEW ORIGINAL
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5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cameron University ROTC Cadet Joel Vann crawls over logs in the belly robber event with a drill sergeant from 1-79th FA April 6, 2021, at Fort Sill. (Photo Credit: Fort Sill Tribune staff) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT SILL, Oklahoma (April 7, 2021) -- Cadets from Cameron University’s Army ROTC “Comanche Battalion” trained with their Fort Sill community partner 1st Battalion, 79th Field Artillery April 6, at the Sgt. 1st Class Forrest Peden Confidence Obstacle Course on post.

Four sophomore and junior cadets followed the lead of drill sergeants as they went through a dozen grueling events on the course.

The cadets’ training was to meet prerequisites so they can attend airborne, and air assault courses this summer, said Maj. Jason Bost, CU ROTC assistant professor of military science.

“I want them to gain confidence in the fact that they can do tough things that they have not done in the past, but more than that I want them to interact with the basic trainees and the drill sergeants and see how different parts of the Army are led, and work together,”  Bost said.

1st Lt. Christopher Lacock, E Battery, 1-79th FA platoon leader, said it was an opportunity for the ROTC cadets to see training at an active-duty unit. His basic combat trainees were in week three of the nine-week training.

“As (future) lieutenants there’s a good chance they might get stationed at a basic training unit as a platoon leader,” Lacock said. This shows them what they can expect in BCT.

Military Science (MS) II (sophomore) Cadet Moises Jaime said the obstacle course was tough.

“It’s a great way to test yourself,” said Jaime, who plans to go into the medical branch. “The Tarzan (horizontal ladder obstacle) was probably the hardest event.”

MSIII Jonathan Gallo compared the obstacle course to life.

“If you feel scared, or have any doubt push through it, same thing in life, same thing if you’re going into the Army,” Gallo said. “Be confident, push through fear, and go through the barrier.”

Master Sgt. Henry Pettigrew, CU ROTC military science instructor, said the obstacle course will be very similar to what the cadets will experience during their summer training in airborne, and air assault. They can identify their weaknesses now and work on them.

He said he was also there to answer any questions the basic combat trainees may have about the Army’s Green-to-Gold (enlisted-to-officer) program.

CU ROTC plans to continue to partner with 1-79th FA for future training, including obstacle courses, and the Army Combat Fitness Test, the master sergeant said.