Taylor Fesender, administrative supervisor, Installation Provost Marshal Office, presents findings from this year’s Leadership Fort Campbell 2.0 program to garrison leadership March 18 at the Garrison Learning Center.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Taylor Fesender, administrative supervisor, Installation Provost Marshal Office, presents findings from this year’s Leadership Fort Campbell 2.0 program to garrison leadership March 18 at the Garrison Learning Center. (Photo Credit: Ethan Steinquest) VIEW ORIGINAL
Colonel Jeremy D. Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander, and Jonathan Hunter, Fort Campbell deputy garrison commander, offer feedback on the Leadership Fort Campbell 2.0 cohort’s presentation March 18 at the Garrison Learning Center.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Colonel Jeremy D. Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander, and Jonathan Hunter, Fort Campbell deputy garrison commander, offer feedback on the Leadership Fort Campbell 2.0 cohort’s presentation March 18 at the Garrison Learning Center. (Photo Credit: Ethan Steinquest) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – After six weeks of intensive training and problem-solving, 21 Leadership Fort Campbell 2.0 students celebrated their graduation March 19 at Wilson Theater.

LFC 2.0 is the garrison’s revised professional development program, which is spread out over a three-month period. This year’s class included representatives from every garrison directorate.

“These employees have raised the bar,” said Scott Galbraith, program facilitator and chief of Training Integration, Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security. “They have navigated through a very demanding curriculum … we were in a virtual world for the first three weeks and they did it with the utmost professionalism.”

Course participants learned and employed Army Design Methodology to help the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation adapt new service approaches for 2025. That effort comes as Generation Z (currently ages 6-24) is expected to quickly grow into the largest demographic on post.

“We have an MWR system and a set of processes and regulations that were designed in the 1990s and early 2000s,” said Col. Jeremy D. Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander. “We are not delivering services to a generation that has far surpassed that decade.”

This year’s LFC cohort presented several potential solutions to Bell, Jonathan Hunter, Fort Campbell deputy garrison commander, and directorate leaders from across the installation March 18.

“I think it was very enlightening, because everyone in here came from so many different positions and viewpoints,” said Stacye Downing, director of Fort Campbell DFMWR. “It was incredible to see the approach, which is completely different than a lot of ways that we go after problems.”

Downing’s favorite suggestion was a virtual fitness center with equipment rental options, which she said immediately called to mind the MWR of 2025.

The class also proposed merging the Warrior Zone and Hooper Bowling Center into a one-stop entertainment center, hosting MWR innovation workshops and creating a greenway to encourage connectivity and pop-up events, among other solutions.

“I think this is going to challenge the Army to take a look at their left and right barriers, at things that constrict and constrain innovation and thoughts,” said Randy Durian, deputy director of Fort Campbell’s Directorate of Emergency Services. “We heard a lot about platforms like RecTrac that we’ve latched onto, and there’s chances for evolution here.”

This year’s cohort had a unique opportunity to put that message directly in front of the Army when briefing Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, commanding general of U.S. Army Installation Management Command, March 5 at the Garrison Learning Center.

“I challenged you when I gave you (the task to brief) Lt. Gen. Gabram, and you rose to that challenge,” Bell told the class during the graduation ceremony. “I’ll say you actually far exceeded any expectation I had in that challenge – you really crushed that engagement.”

LFC 2.0’s success during that meeting led to a follow-up briefing with Paul D. Burk, director of IMCOM Leadership G9, Family and MWR Programs, hosted virtually March 23.

“That speaks volumes of their work,” Galbraith said. “The way they’ve interacted with one another, the way they’ve looked at the problem, the way they challenge each other has just been incredible to watch and I continue to grow through that.”

Claire Kelley, Department of the Army CP29 apprentice, DPTMS, received an extra level of recognition as the class’s emerging leader. She was selected through a peer evaluation focused on several factors: professionalism, accountability, attitude, teamwork, commitment, honesty, sensitivity and design.

“The group of leaders we had this year was just incredible,” Kelley said. “So, to be recognized as the emerging leader for this class is very humbling. It’s been a lot of long days and a lot of hard work, but I think at the end of the day we were able to create a really great product.”

Kelley said the program provided professional development and networking opportunities that will help her for years to come and considers her experience with LFC 2.0 a career highlight.

“One of the reasons Leadership Fort Campbell is so amazing is that it really doesn’t matter your GS level, or your age or the number of years of experience you have under your belt,” she said. “Everyone in the classroom is treated with an equal level of respect and good ideas are incorporated regard-less of where they come from.”