Gen. James C. McConville, U.S. Army Chief of Staff, and other Army leaders receive an outbrief from the Army Talent Management enterprise during the third Army Talent Management Annual Planning Conference on March 18, 2021 at the Mark Center in Crystal City, Va.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Gen. James C. McConville, U.S. Army Chief of Staff, and other Army leaders receive an outbrief from the Army Talent Management enterprise during the third Army Talent Management Annual Planning Conference on March 18, 2021 at the Mark Center in Crystal City, Va. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
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The third annual Army Talent Management Planning Conference (Virtual) began Monday morning, Mar. 15, with remarks from Army Chief of Staff, Gen. James C. McConville.

McConville oversaw the inception of the Army Talent Management Task Force while serving as the Army’s G-1 in 2016. He later attended the first annual Army Talent Management Planning Conference in January 2019 while serving as the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army.

“We’re in a war for talent,” McConville said. “We want the best and brightest to stay in the Army, to know it’s a great place to spend 20 to 30 years."

“We’re in a war for talent,” McConville said. “We want the best and brightest to stay in the Army, to know it’s a great place to spend 20 to 30 years.”

McConville was followed by Heather E. McGowan, a future-of-work strategist and author of The Adaptation Advantage: Let Go, Learn Fast, and Thrive in the Future of Work. McGowan spoke about the sort of leadership required in the 21st Century workforce.

“We’re moving from leadership that’s top-down and depersonalized, to one that’s bottom-up," said McGowan. "It’s coaching. It’s helping folks get self-propelled. You’re guiding people, you’re not just pushing them.”

“We’re moving from leadership that’s top-down and depersonalized, to one that’s bottom-up," said McGowan. "It’s coaching. It’s helping folks get self-propelled. You’re guiding people, you’re not just pushing them.”

Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, the Director of the Army Talent Management Task Force, also cited the evolving work environment as a key reason for the Army to adapt to the challenges of the 21st Century.

“We need to change because our society is changing. The economy is changing,” said Drew. “How do you man the Army that’s an All-Volunteer Force in twenty years?"

In his opening remarks, Drew noted the key to building a 21st Century Army was a system which managed people based on a thorough understanding of the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of individual Soldiers.

Last year, the Army began to use assessment data to make more informed decisions about those it places in battalion and brigade command through the Battalion Commander Assessment Program and the Colonel’s Command Assessment Program. Drew explained the Army would begin implementing assessments much earlier in a Soldier’s developmental timeline, allowing them to capitalize on their strengths and offering coaching opportunities to work on their growth areas through the Army Coaching Program.

Attendees from across the Army Talent Management enterprise had the opportunity to submit questions for the Army Talent Management Task Force. Drew and subject-matter experts from the ATMTF fielded questions from across the Army on topics ranging from the Army Talent Alignment Process to the use of objective assessment data to better inform officer promotions.

The third annual planning conference brings together stakeholders from across the Army as they work together to create an enduring vision for Army Talent Management and create a force capable of competing in great power conflict in 2035 and beyond.

For resources about Army Talent Management, visit https://talent.army.mil/.