Soldiers demonstrate use of a device attached to 2.5 ton 6x6 truck March 19, 1951, used for picking up W 110 B wire in open terrain at Camp McCoy, Wis.  This device picks up the wire from the side of the road or in open country by lifting it off of the ground through the tension of a power-driven winch on the back of the vehicle. Wire is picked up over the front of the truck, eliminating a loop in the wire  and a wire crew on the ground, giving it a practiced pick-up speed of 10 to 12 miles per hour with an experienced crew.  The device consists of two vertical and horizontal rollers mounted on a rod over the front bumper, and two horizontal rollers in the rear of the cab, enabling the wire to clear the cab.  The pick-up accomplished by a power-driven winch with a clutch.  The device was developed by Sgt. Walter Wehr of Minor, N.D., now with the 465th Field Artillery battalion, Camp McCoy, Wis.  (Historical photo)
Soldiers demonstrate use of a device attached to 2.5 ton 6x6 truck March 19, 1951, used for picking up W 110 B wire in open terrain at Camp McCoy, Wis. This device picks up the wire from the side of the road or in open country by lifting it off of the ground through the tension of a power-driven winch on the back of the vehicle. Wire is picked up over the front of the truck, eliminating a loop in the wire and a wire crew on the ground, giving it a practiced pick-up speed of 10 to 12 miles per hour with an experienced crew. The device consists of two vertical and horizontal rollers mounted on a rod over the front bumper, and two horizontal rollers in the rear of the cab, enabling the wire to clear the cab. The pick-up accomplished by a power-driven winch with a clutch. The device was developed by Sgt. Walter Wehr of Minor, N.D., now with the 465th Field Artillery battalion, Camp McCoy, Wis. (Historical photo) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

Fort McCoy, Wis., was founded in 1909. Here's a look back at its history from March 2021 and back.

65 Years Ago — March 1946

Camp McCoy underwent a concentrated period of inspection in March 1946 as representatives of the Sixth Service Command toured the post and its activities, from headquarters to the prisoner-of-war camp, not overlooking a single post operation.

Separation center activities were given particular emphasis in the inspection, as was the station hospital.

60 Years Ago — March 1951

There was good trout fishing on post, at least for military personnel, post officials said in a March 1951 edition of The Real McCoy.

Approximately 4,800 7- to 10-inch trout were planted in McCoy ponds the week of March25, 1951.The Federal Fish and Wildlife Service made the arrangements for the fish, taken from Kammel Coulee, near La Crosse, to be planted.

McCoy’s ponds and streams were not open to the general public at that time.

35 Years Ago — March 1986

More than 900 people toured Phase I of the Wisconsin State Patrol Academy’s new complex located at Fort McCoy during the open house held March 7-8, 1986.

“We were very pleased with both the number of people who came to see the new facility and the comments they made,” said Dick Kildahl, director of planning and budget for the Division of State Patrol. “People were impressed with the beauty and functional ability of the facility.

“However, I think what they appreciated most was the fact that so much effort went into planning for energy conservation,” Kildahl said.

25 Years Ago — March 1996

Digitized photographic technology was newly in use at the Training Support Center (TSC) Photo Section at Fort McCoy in March 1996.

Allan Harding, photo section coordinator for TSC, said a new camera system, which uses computer technology to record and print pictures, was introduced in early March after an extensive training period. It was being used to photograph award ceremonies, historical photography, and record-material documentation. Record material is photographic material of all military activities that was sent to an archive in Washington, D.C.

Doug Brown, photographer for TSC, said the new equipment would eliminate the darkroom setup of mixing, storing, and using chemicals to develop and print pictures.