Fort Polk’s Sustainability Program supports Army missions while protecting its natural resources. Fort Polk implements sustainability practices and principles to enhance training opportunities and ensure long-term availability of training areas. Sustainability practices have reduced life-cycle costs, increased unit performance and cost avoidance, which directly supports the installation’s training mission.
1 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Fort Polk’s Sustainability Program supports Army missions while protecting its natural resources. Fort Polk implements sustainability practices and principles to enhance training opportunities and ensure long-term availability of training areas. Sustainability practices have reduced life-cycle costs, increased unit performance and cost avoidance, which directly supports the installation’s training mission. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Prescribed burning at Fort Stewart provides the installation with benefits such as wildfire reduction, a superior military training platform, enhanced threatened and endangered species habitat and improved forest ecosystem health. To keep forest fuels manageable, the Forestry Branch maintains a prescribed burning program that is recognized by national fire experts as one of the largest in the world. An aerial ignition system and ground ignition terra-torches are used to implement this record-setting burn program.
2 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Prescribed burning at Fort Stewart provides the installation with benefits such as wildfire reduction, a superior military training platform, enhanced threatened and endangered species habitat and improved forest ecosystem health. To keep forest fuels manageable, the Forestry Branch maintains a prescribed burning program that is recognized by national fire experts as one of the largest in the world. An aerial ignition system and ground ignition terra-torches are used to implement this record-setting burn program. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo) VIEW ORIGINAL
An archeologist recovers a cache of musket balls from an excavated trench from this Fort Stewart archaeological site during phase III mitigation of an 18th century ranger outpost known as Fort Argyle. Fort Argyle was the first colonial settlement at Fort Stewart and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The team also completed a project to mitigate river erosion that could have adversely affected the site.
3 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An archeologist recovers a cache of musket balls from an excavated trench from this Fort Stewart archaeological site during phase III mitigation of an 18th century ranger outpost known as Fort Argyle. Fort Argyle was the first colonial settlement at Fort Stewart and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The team also completed a project to mitigate river erosion that could have adversely affected the site. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo) VIEW ORIGINAL
A helicopter moves contaminated soil from the Upper Camp to the Beach Staging Area at the Cape Prominence Aircraft Warning Service Station.  Soil excavation and tank removal activities used a surgical approach to minimize impacts to the historic military site. The low-impact approach successfully avoided large landscape disturbances to national wildlife refuge lands.
4 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A helicopter moves contaminated soil from the Upper Camp to the Beach Staging Area at the Cape Prominence Aircraft Warning Service Station. Soil excavation and tank removal activities used a surgical approach to minimize impacts to the historic military site. The low-impact approach successfully avoided large landscape disturbances to national wildlife refuge lands. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo) VIEW ORIGINAL
The Minnesota Army National Guard’s Sustainability Team has been integral to the design and construction of the new Arden Hills Division Headquarters. The sustainability features include a 60-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system expected to meet 2.5% of the electrical load, daylighting, solar tube style skylighting, and a ground source heat pump system.
5 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Minnesota Army National Guard’s Sustainability Team has been integral to the design and construction of the new Arden Hills Division Headquarters. The sustainability features include a 60-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system expected to meet 2.5% of the electrical load, daylighting, solar tube style skylighting, and a ground source heat pump system. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo) VIEW ORIGINAL
A historic wagon road, dated from 1878, was part of the Oregon Trail that connected the Missouri River with the valleys of Oregon.  A portion of the trail located on Camp Umatilla Oregon was documented using LiDAR and photography. This particular section has been improved with cobbles lining the edges of the trail.
6 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A historic wagon road, dated from 1878, was part of the Oregon Trail that connected the Missouri River with the valleys of Oregon. A portion of the trail located on Camp Umatilla Oregon was documented using LiDAR and photography. This particular section has been improved with cobbles lining the edges of the trail. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

WASHINGTON -- The Army announced the winners of the 2020 Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards program, the highest honor conferred by the Army in the field of environmental science and sustainability.

The Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, Mr. J. E. ”Jack” Surash, P.E., selected four installations and two teams to represent the Army in the 2021 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards Program.

"The Army recognizes successes that demonstrate the Army Environmental Program’s focus on supporting the highest level of installation and Soldier readiness. This focus ensures the Army continues to preserve the natural infrastructure and realistic environments our Soldiers need in order to train, fight and win,” said Surash. “Our Army environmental teams deserve this recognition. Their work protects human health, improves Soldier and family quality of life and protects the natural environment.”

This year's winners demonstrated superior program management and presented a variety of environmental technical solutions that benefit and enable the mission, are transferrable to other Army organizations and installations, involve local stakeholders, and produce measurable outcomes and a positive impact.

Congratulations to the Army's 2020 award winners:

  • Natural Resources Conservation – Large Installation: Fort Stewart/Hunter Army Airfield
  • Cultural Resources Management – Small Installation: Camp Umatilla, Oregon Army National Guard
  • Sustainability – Non-Industrial Installation: U.S. Army Garrison Fort Polk
  • Environmental Restoration – Installation: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District
  • Cultural Resources Management – Team/Individual: Cultural Resources Management Team, Fort Stewart/Hunter Army Airfield
  • Sustainability – Team/Individual: Sustainability Team, Minnesota Army National Guard

The winners of this year's environmental awards stand out as examples of how environmental stewardship and sustainability play a crucial role in the Army's mission readiness. Investments that the Army makes in environmental programs and sustainability initiatives pay dividends in sustaining realistic training and testing capabilities both now and in the future.

For more information about the Secretary of the Army Environmental Award program, visit the U.S. Army Environmental Command's website at https://aec.army.mil/index.php/awards.