Phillip Carpenter (left to right), chief operating officer for Lendlease Communities; Col. Jeremy D. Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander; Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, commanding general of U.S. Army Installation Management Command; Sgt. Christina Meyer, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison-Fort Campbell; Maj. Gen. Brian E. Winski, commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Fort Campbell; and Karsten Haake, project director for Campbell Crossing, Lendlease’s privatized military housing community on Fort Campbell; broke ground on Erevia Park during a ceremony March 4 on post. Meyer served as a representative of the 144 junior enlisted Soldiers who will occupy these homes. The project is part of a larger $87.4 million development plan the Army approved in 2020, and is funded through Lendlease’s project reinvestment account. [Photo by Sam Shore/Fort Campbell]
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Phillip Carpenter (left to right), chief operating officer for Lendlease Communities; Col. Jeremy D. Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander; Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, commanding general of U.S. Army Installation Management Command; Sgt. Christina Meyer, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison-Fort Campbell; Maj. Gen. Brian E. Winski, commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Fort Campbell; and Karsten Haake, project director for Campbell Crossing, Lendlease’s privatized military housing community on Fort Campbell; broke ground on Erevia Park during a ceremony March 4 on post. Meyer served as a representative of the 144 junior enlisted Soldiers who will occupy these homes. The project is part of a larger $87.4 million development plan the Army approved in 2020, and is funded through Lendlease’s project reinvestment account. [Photo by Sam Shore/Fort Campbell] (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, Commanding General, U.S. Army Installation Management Command reflects on the years of planning between the Army and its privatized housing partner, Lendlease, which preceded the Erevia Park groundbreaking ceremony, March 4. The project is part of a larger $87.4 million development plan that will construct 144 new three- and four-bedroom homes, majorly renovate 170 homes and demolish 250 homes on Fort Campbell over the next five years. [Photos by Sam Shore, Fort Campbell]
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, Commanding General, U.S. Army Installation Management Command reflects on the years of planning between the Army and its privatized housing partner, Lendlease, which preceded the Erevia Park groundbreaking ceremony, March 4. The project is part of a larger $87.4 million development plan that will construct 144 new three- and four-bedroom homes, majorly renovate 170 homes and demolish 250 homes on Fort Campbell over the next five years. [Photos by Sam Shore, Fort Campbell] (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

Fort Campbell and Lendlease, the Army’s privatized housing partner, kicked off a large-scale housing development project March 4 with a groundbreaking for Erevia Park, a 144-unit community for junior enlisted Soldiers.

This project is part of an $87.4 million development plan that includes funding for new construction, major renovations to New Hammond Heights homes and demolition of outdated homes in LaPointe Village over the next five years. The multimillion-dollar project was approved by the Army in 2020 and is funded through Lendlease’s project reinvestment account.

The groundbreaking celebrates significant progress made in the Army’s housing investment plan that prioritizes improvements to on-post housing today and into the future. For more than a year, Army leaders have met with Soldiers, their Families, housing staff and privatized housing partners that manage housing on Army installations to address both the immediate and long-term needs of post residents.

“Today’s groundbreaking communicates to our Soldiers and Families that the Army is working hard in partnership with Lendlease to bring about housing improvements at a rapid pace,” said Col. Jeremy Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander. “We are keeping a promise to our Soldiers and our Families that their feedback helps improve quality of life on the installation.

Replacing and renovating junior enlisted communities is a top priority for the Army, Fort Campbell Housing Office and U.S. Army Garrison-Fort Campbell.

“This doesn’t just happen. It’s been a couple years, $87 million worth of planning,” said Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram, commanding general of U.S. Army Installation Management Command during the ceremony. “We’re not done here at Fort Campbell, we’re not done across the Army. This is really, frankly, just the beginning,” he said.

Fort Campbell leaders said with nearly 65% of on-post housing predating 1978, and many approaching 100 years old over the life of the 50-year commitment between the Army and Lendlease, the planned major improvements, especially building new homes are critical steps forward.

“We are thrilled to come together today and celebrate the commencement of the $87 million housing development project here at Fort Campbell,” said Phillip Carpenter, chief operating officer for Lendlease Communities. “Since 2003, we have been providing housing to our service members and Families here at Fort Campbell, and we are incredibly proud to continue in our commitment of providing homes and amenities residents both desire and deserve.”

Fort Campbell also is among six installations receiving funding from an additional $1.1 billion investment Lendlease negotiated with the U.S. Army, which Carpenter said will further improve privatized housing.

“While plans are being finalized, this investment has the potential to construct over 500 new homes, renovations of almost another 500 homes and the additional demolition of 400 older homes across our inventory here at Fort Campbell,” he said.

Erevia Park

Fort Campbell’s newest community to be built will offer three- and four-bedroom units focused on functionality, open spaces and energy efficiency.

Among the features Soldiers and Families can expect: fully-fenced yards, oversized garages, individual driveways, covered patios, eat-in kitchens and integrated technology.

“Family togetherness is a priority for our residents,” said Karsten Haake, project director for Campbell Crossing, Lendlease’s privatized military housing community on Fort Campbell. “Our new construction and renovations will provide more open, flexible living spaces such as living rooms and kitchens for Families to spend time with one another.”

That extra space also allows for more storage in the units, which measure 1,500-1,700 square feet.

“We understand that between frequent moves and gear accumulating through military life, storage is crucial for military homes,” he said. “We took that into consideration when we planned both our renovated homes and the new ones that we’re going to build.”

Erevia Park’s design in particular is meant to offer an urban community feel, with large green spaces, walkable design and trails connecting to other communities on post.

The neighborhood is named after the late Sgt. Santiago Erevia, a Medal of Honor recipient who fought in the Vietnam War as part of the 101st Airborne Division.

Erevia distinguished himself on May 21, 1969 while serving as a radio-telephone operator in C Company, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), during a search-and-clear mission near Tam Ky City, Republic of Vietnam. “With his platoon headquarters pinned down by heavy enemy fire from four bunkers, then-Spc. 4 Erevia charged and single-handedly eliminated the bunkers,” his citation read.

Despite his actions, Erevia was not awarded the Medal of Honor until March 2014 – nearly 45 years later – after the Pentagon more closely reviewed his record.

“A lesson for us all is it’s never too late to make it right,” said Major General Brian E. Winski, commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Fort Campbell. “We’re just incredibly proud that we now have something named in Sgt. Santiago Erevia’s honor, and it’s going to be this great community, this great complex of homes here that our young Soldiers who were just like he was in 1969 are going to live and thrive.”

New Hammond Heights

Alongside Erevia Park’s construction, Campbell Crossing plans to begin interior and exterior renovations on 170 homes in the New Hammond Heights community starting May 2021, with completion expected in fall 2023.

Work will include complete exterior replacements, living room upgrades, kitchen renovations to increase functionality, full master bedroom remodels and more.

“These improvements are all geared toward ensuring we continue to meet the needs of our service members and Families today, and for generations of Soldiers to come,” Haake said.

Renovations at each building are expected to take six to eight weeks, and due to the extensive scope of work, the units will need to be vacant. As homes are scheduled for renovations, residents will be notified at least 120 days in advance via email and by phone to discuss options for relocation.

“As we progress through the development plan, we’ve established a dedicated team of customer care representatives who will work with each individual resident or Family who may be impacted to provide as little disruption as possible,” Haake said.

Campbell Crossing plans to provide homes for any Families needing to relocate while working to meet their preferences. For many, that could mean moving into the newly renovated spaces, Haake said.

"In addition, we begin working with our leasing team as soon as plans for demolition or renovations are put in place, ensuring suitable alternative accommodations can be provided to our residents and naturally transition our neighborhoods to minimize disruption for our Families," he said.

LaPointe Village and beyond

Once the new construction and renovations are completed, Campbell Crossing will demolish 250 outdated homes in LaPointe Village.

Haake said that process should start in 2024, and Families living there will receive the same relocation assistance as those in the New Hammond Heights community.

“Repurposing that space will be the next phase after this out-year plan,” he said.

Building new homes in LaPointe Village is among the ways Fort Campbell’s leadership is looking to invest their share of the $1.1 billion, Haake said.

Until then, Soldiers and Families can expect to see a focus on New Hammond Heights and Erevia Park as Campbell Crossing gets to work on the improvement plan.

“Ultimately, we want our residents to have a positive living experience during their time with us,” Haake said. “We’re committed to providing a safe and healthy home where Families can live, work and thrive, and our planned community is an example of how we can continue to proactively do that.”