A company of Women’s Army Corps members march in formation down Sycamore Street in Petersburg, Va., in the summer of 1951. The historic and continued contributions of women in America will be recognized during Fort Lee’s annual Women’s History Month observance set for March 18. The program will feature Tracy Bradford, director of the Army Women’s Museum, as its guest speaker. The event will be livestreamed at www.facebook.com/USAALU. (U.S. Army Photo)
A company of Women’s Army Corps members march in formation down Sycamore Street in Petersburg, Va., in the summer of 1951. The historic and continued contributions of women in America will be recognized during Fort Lee’s annual Women’s History Month observance set for March 18. The program will feature Tracy Bradford, director of the Army Women’s Museum, as its guest speaker. The event will be livestreamed at www.facebook.com/USAALU. (U.S. Army Photo) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEE, Va. – All community members are invited to watch a livestream of the Fort Lee Women’s History Month Observance set for March 18, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. The program broadcast can be viewed at www.facebook.com/USAALU.

The Army Logistics University Support Battalion is hosting the event on behalf of the Combined Arms Support Command. The theme of the observance is “Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced.”

Capt. Aniya Moore, commander of C Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, will open the program with her rendition of the national anthem. That will be followed by introductory remarks, a reading of the WHM presidential proclamation and the presentation of an 8-minute historical film provided by the Army Women’s Museum.

AWM Director Tracy Bradford will be the featured speaker. She recently returned to Fort Lee after a three-year stint as a museum educator at the National Museum of the U.S. Army, Fort Belvoir. There, she led a nationally recognized interdisciplinary team that recruited and trained over 200 volunteers for the NMUSA Docent Corps.

Bradford was the director of education at the AWM earlier in her career. She helped organize the popular “Night at the Museum” activity for youths and served as the educational consultant for the PBS documentary “Unsung Heroes: The Story of America's Female Patriots.”

An educator for 25 years, Bradford has taught in secondary education, private industry and the federal government. She has been a featured speaker at the Smithsonian Institution, the Virginia Association of Museums, the American Association of State and Local History, and The Society for Military History. Bradford holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from The College of William & Mary and a Master of Arts from George Washington University.

The month-long national WHM celebration honors women who have shaped America’s history and its future through public service and government leadership. The observance is an off-shoot of International Working Women’s Day that started in 1911.

The first Women’s History Week was observed in 1978. It gained national recognition in 1980 when then-President Jimmy Carter issued the first proclamation in support of the commemoration.

A portion of Carter’s written tribute read, “From the first settlers who came to our shores, (and) from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.”