BARRACKS RENNOVATIONS IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE

By Amy PhillipsFebruary 26, 2021

Building 295 is a $18 million Full Facility Restoration (FFR) project. The barracks at Fort Hunter Liggett were built in the 1970s, and like barracks across the country, are in need of repair and upgrades. Building 295 (originally a transient Soldiers barracks), is redesignated for Soldiers attending the 80th Training Command’s TASS Training Center. This requires it to be renovated to TRADOC standards requiring larger rooms and individual bathrooms.
Building 295 is a $18 million Full Facility Restoration (FFR) project. The barracks at Fort Hunter Liggett were built in the 1970s, and like barracks across the country, are in need of repair and upgrades. Building 295 (originally a transient Soldiers barracks), is redesignated for Soldiers attending the 80th Training Command’s TASS Training Center. This requires it to be renovated to TRADOC standards requiring larger rooms and individual bathrooms. (Photo Credit: Amy Phillips) VIEW ORIGINAL

Good chow is not the only thing that easily boosts morale of troops – good living conditions helps them unwind after a tough day of training. Barracks renovations are part of the Fort Hunter Liggett’s strategic modernization efforts to support troop readiness.

The barracks at Fort Hunter Liggett were built in the 1970s, and like barracks across the country, are in need of repair and upgrades. Building 295 (originally a transient Soldiers barracks), has received special attention because it is designated for Soldiers attending the 80th Training Command’s TASS Training Center. This requires it to be renovated to TRADOC standards requiring larger rooms and individual bathrooms.

“Building 295 is a $18 million Full Facility Restoration (FFR) project,” said Bob Sanders, the Directorate of Public Works (DPW) director. “That means we basically take out all the old and replace them with new items. Everything from floors, ceiling, HVAC, and more.”

Through the Army Installation Management Directorate (ARIMD) FFR program, aged facilities are brought up to modern construction code standards. The FHL FFR was approved in FY20 and is expected to be complete in 2023. New blast-proof windows have already been installed, and contractors are now gutting out the interior.

“A $15 million renovation project has also been awarded for three other barracks consisting of basic upgrades of floors, windows and doors,” said Sanders.

“DPW works with ARIMD and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to facilitate the projects, and design development,” said Sonia Suggs, USACE Project Manager. The Louisville District manages project design, awards, and retains the construction contract. The Sacramento District manages the day to day construction oversight. “The team’s goal is to provide quality housing for the Soldiers,” said Suggs.