Here I, Marie Pihulic, sit inside a Bod Pod Feb. 2 at the Army Wellness Center. The Bod Pod accurately measures a person’s body fat composition using air displacement. I received my results as a baseline measurement in my fitness goal of gaining muscle mass.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Here I, Marie Pihulic, sit inside a Bod Pod Feb. 2 at the Army Wellness Center. The Bod Pod accurately measures a person’s body fat composition using air displacement. I received my results as a baseline measurement in my fitness goal of gaining muscle mass. (Photo Credit: Kayla Lovewell) VIEW ORIGINAL
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT SILL, Okla., Feb. 4, 2021 — When I left the Army, the one thing I really missed was organized PT.

This may sound strange to those who are currently grinding it out every morning and longing for a break.

It wasn’t that I necessarily enjoyed getting up early and working out in whatever conditions nature offered, but the results of it.

There was no waffling on whether or not you should go to PT, or wondering what you would do once you got there.

It was a prescription, taken daily. And my physical condition was better for it.

I also really loved challenging myself against my peers.

Racing to the finish to see if I could beat the executive officer in my battalion, and grinning from ear-to-ear when I did.

I grew up playing sports and when I left the Army, that is what I missed. Being on a team.

I did find another team many years later in the 580 RollerGirls, Lawton’s roller derby team.

Once again, I was showing up for the physical conditioning and pushing myself in the competitive environment. Of course, COVID-19 has changed that and currently we are not allowed to practice or compete.

So two things have fallen off: my routine and my muscles.

I have been working out, but it is sporadic. I am naturally a skinny person who gains weight mostly in my stomach.

Just the other day, my 4-year-old asked if I was having another baby. So, that’s where I’m at.

I’m throwing my proverbial hat into the Army Wellness Center’s Kick Start Challenge.

And coincidentally it meets all of the needs I had with my team — the social aspect and accountability in having a partner.

It doesn’t hurt that the partner I chose, Monica Guthrie, is also highly competitive.

My goal is to create a routine. That’s it. I figure once I get the routine, the gains will come.

I had my first Bod Pod assessment Tuesday morning. It’s like going into a spaceship while someone looks on.

Well, maybe not that dramatic as you’re not moving, but it is an enclosed machine with an orb glass.

It determines the amount of body fat you have, and the Army Wellness Center health educator takes that information as a starting measurement.

Next, I sat down with a health educator and discussed what my health goals are.

This is the first challenge of the year for the AWC, but there are more to come.

Also, any Soldier, family member, retiree, veteran, and Department of the Army civilian can use these resources to track their health at any time.

Having a team who is looking after your wellness could be expensive, but is offered for free on Fort Sill. Take advantage. I’m already not regretting the decision.

To make an appointment at the center call 580-442-0680, or visit Building 2934 Marcy Road.