Col. John "Ryan" Bailey, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency, welcomes fellow USAMMA leaders during a strategic workshop meeting on Jan. 20 at Fort Detrick, Maryland.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Col. John "Ryan" Bailey, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency, welcomes fellow USAMMA leaders during a strategic workshop meeting on Jan. 20 at Fort Detrick, Maryland. (Photo Credit: C.J. Lovelace) VIEW ORIGINAL
Col. John "Ryan" Bailey, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency, welcomes fellow USAMMA leaders during a strategy workshop meeting on Jan. 20 at Fort Detrick, Maryland.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Col. John "Ryan" Bailey, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency, welcomes fellow USAMMA leaders during a strategy workshop meeting on Jan. 20 at Fort Detrick, Maryland. (Photo Credit: C.J. Lovelace) VIEW ORIGINAL
Leaders at the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency brainstorm ideas during a strategy workshop meeting on Jan. 20 at Fort Detrick, Maryland.
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FORT DETRICK, Md. -- The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency’s role in the wider Army medical enterprise has undergone some changes, so the agency’s leadership is taking proactive steps to continue providing premier support for medical readiness on a global scale.

“There’s been a lot of transformation over the past couple years with the standup of the Army Medical Logistics Command,” USAMMA Commander Col. John “Ryan” Bailey said.

“USAMMA, as a direct reporting unit, needed to look at our mission statement, our vision statement and our lines of effort to make sure that we were better nested with AMLC [and] effective and efficient at delivering capability in support of global health care operations,” Bailey said.

AMLC, activated in 2019, serves as the Army's primary operational medical logistics and sustainment command, responsible for managing the global supply chain and medical materiel readiness across the total force.

To examine the organization's strategic direction under AMLC and its higher commands, USAMMA leaders, both military and civilian, gathered for a two-day strategic workshop in January.

Discussions resulted in reworked mission and vision statements that better reflect the organization’s sustainment role, as well as a renewed focus on various lines of effort -- most importantly, its people.

“Our people are the most important asset in our organization,” Bailey said. “We need to make sure we’re recruiting the right people, retaining the right people. We’re looking at ways to be more diverse and innovative, and taking care of people was one of the priority lines of efforts that we came out of this workshop with. We’re really excited about that.”

Other focus areas included further steps to integrate strategic data and technology, the creation of a new integrated logistics support center and enhanced sustainment operations.

The agency’s new mission and vision statements center on USAMMA’s new motto -- globally responsive, ready and resilient.

“This is something that USAMMA lives by,” Bailey said, explaining that USAMMA’s mission is “unique” and highly specialized as it provides Class VIII medical materiel support for the Army and joint operational forces.

USAMMA oversees three medical maintenance operations divisions that repair vital medical devices that ensure top-notch operational health care for warfighters. It maintains prepositioned medical stocks, unit deployment packages and deployable hospital center assets to support operations around the world.

And in the past year, USAMMA’s role as a vaccine ordering and distribution oversight hub for the Department of Defense has come even further to the forefront with the whole-of-government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Regardless of what challenges arise, it’s the people that ensure USAMMA’s mission is met every single day, Bailey said.

“It takes all of us working together,” he said, pledging his thanks to the agency’s workforce of roughly 400 people. “It doesn’t matter your role in the organization … you’re a critical part to helping us achieve our mission.”