Commander hands over reins of brigade

By Kelvin RingoldJanuary 21, 2021

New 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud, hands the guidon to Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Jackson Jan. 14.  During a change-of-command ceremony, the transfer of the guidon to the senior enlisted noncommissioned officer signals the transfer of command to the new commander. (U.S. Army photo by Kelvin Ringold)
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – New 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud, hands the guidon to Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Jackson Jan. 14. During a change-of-command ceremony, the transfer of the guidon to the senior enlisted noncommissioned officer signals the transfer of command to the new commander. (U.S. Army photo by Kelvin Ringold) (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) VIEW ORIGINAL
The 1st Medical Brigade’s outgoing commander, Col. Robert F. Howe II, speaks with Soldiers before his ceremony.   The 1st Medical Brigade held a change-of-command ceremony Jan. 14 on Cameron Field between Howe, and new 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold)
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 1st Medical Brigade’s outgoing commander, Col. Robert F. Howe II, speaks with Soldiers before his ceremony. The 1st Medical Brigade held a change-of-command ceremony Jan. 14 on Cameron Field between Howe, and new 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) VIEW ORIGINAL
Col. Robert F. Howe II, the outgoing 1st Med. Bde. Commander, passes the guidon to the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s Commanding General, Brig. Gen. Ronald R. Ragin Jan. 14.  During a change-of-command ceremony, the transfer of the guidon signals the relinquishment of command to the new commander. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold)
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Col. Robert F. Howe II, the outgoing 1st Med. Bde. Commander, passes the guidon to the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s Commanding General, Brig. Gen. Ronald R. Ragin Jan. 14. During a change-of-command ceremony, the transfer of the guidon signals the relinquishment of command to the new commander. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) VIEW ORIGINAL
Col. Roger Giraud, Commander, 1st Med. Bde., looks to his new unit formation before the ceremony comes to an end.  The 1st Medical Brigade held a change-of-command ceremony Jan. 14 on Cameron Field between Robert Howe II, and new 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud. (U.S. Army by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold)
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Col. Roger Giraud, Commander, 1st Med. Bde., looks to his new unit formation before the ceremony comes to an end. The 1st Medical Brigade held a change-of-command ceremony Jan. 14 on Cameron Field between Robert Howe II, and new 1st Med. Bde. Commander, Col. Roger Giraud. (U.S. Army by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT HOOD, Texas– Col. Robert Howe II, relinquished command of the 1st Medical Brigade to Col. Roger Giraud, during a change-of-command ceremony, Jan. 14, on Cameron Field.

Known as the largest, oldest and most expeditionary medical brigade in the Army, the 1st Med. Bde. is home to approximately 2,600 Soldiers spread out between 55 units, across 14 installations.

Howe took command of the brigade in January 2019 and the Silver Knights consistently raised the bar of excellence with each new mission accomplishment, and the brigade was always called upon to provide medical support for training exercises and deployment missions worldwide.

“Let’s give all these troopers an enormous round of applause for their impact making sure our Soldiers are secure, safe and that they are getting the very best medical care worldwide,” Brig. Gen. Ronald Ragin, the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s commanding general, said.

During Howe’s two-year tenure, the 1st Med. Bde. maintained a high-operational tempo. The brigade deployed 15 teams and units around the globe, supporting 12 Army operations in support of four different global commands, and currently have Soldiers deployed across four continents.

“The Silver Knights continue to distinguish themselves at home and abroad,” Ragin said. “It’s a testament to their professionalism and Rob’s outstanding leadership.”

As the Army, nation and world continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, the brigade was on the frontlines supporting efforts across the Central and Southwest United States, New York City and Seattle.

“This brigade’s medical readiness not only saved lives, but reaffirmed the confidence of the American people in the capabilities of their Army and the amazing professionalism of its medical corps,” Ragin said.

Howe and the Silver Knights were able to succeed in many legacy-defining missions and accomplishments, and Howe gave all credit to the Soldiers and leaders he had the privilege to command.

“I’m incredibly proud and humbled to have served with such an extraordinary team,” Howe said. “You are the heroes here today and I was blessed to share in your trials and triumphs.”

As Howe addressed the Soldiers, leaders, family members and friends in attendance, as well as those watching virtually, the pride he felt was evident, as he thanked everyone who supported the unit one final time.

“It is with deep gratitude that I offer my farewell,” Howe said. “This was the ultimate professional honor to serve with you all. Thanks again to the many families, friends and loved ones who shared this journey with us.”

As Giraud looked across the field and in the stands at his new Army Family and community, he vowed to pick up where Howe and the Silver Knights left off.