U.S. Army Lt. Col. Nancy Harris listens to teammates during the Leader Reaction Exercise at the Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) at Fort Knox, Ky. on Nov. 9, 2020. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army Lt. Col. Nancy Harris listens to teammates during the Leader Reaction Exercise at the Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) at Fort Knox, Ky. on Nov. 9, 2020. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets. (Photo Credit: Army Talent Management Task Force) VIEW ORIGINAL
Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) candidates listen to welcoming remarks by the Army Talent Management Task Force at Fort Knox, Ky. on Nov. 4, 2020. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) candidates listen to welcoming remarks by the Army Talent Management Task Force at Fort Knox, Ky. on Nov. 4, 2020. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets. (Photo Credit: Army Talent Management Task Force) VIEW ORIGINAL

The Army published the names of the officers selected for battalion command and key billets for fiscal year 2022. Common Access Card (CAC) users may access the list on the U.S. Army Human Resources Command website by clicking here.

In November, the Army held the second Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) for officers who are eligible for consideration in the Fiscal Year 22 Lieutenant Colonels Active Competitive Category Centralized Selection List Board.

The Battalion Commander Assessment Program is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command a key billets.

Not yet ready for command

Officers who participated in BCAP 22 were found ready for command or not yet ready for command. Those who do not pass the standard Army height and weight screening event or who fail a three-event Army Physical Fitness Test do not continue in the program and are found not yet ready for command.

The other way officers are determined not yet ready for command is a decision made by a panel of senior officers during the Army Comprehensive Talent Interview. If an officer is determined not yet ready for command, they are notified by the first general officer in their chain of command and will have an opportunity to compete again the following year, if eligible.

For those the panel determines ready for command, they are selected as principals and alternates based on an order of merit list determined by a combination of their scores in five areas:

CSL Board Performance

Physical Fitness

Written Communication

Verbal Communication

Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Assessment

BCAP 22 picks 118 different principals

When compared to the list of principals that the legacy Command Selection List process would have produced, BCAP 22 drove a 28 percent change. Stated differently, the legacy CSL would have presented a list of 424 officers selected as principals. After undergoing the Battalion Commander Assessment Program, this list of 424 principals contains 118 different officers than the legacy CSL system.

This supports the talent management principle that more relevant information about officers leads to different decisions about who is selected to command and key billets.

Officers returning a second time find success

Of the 76 officers who returned to BCAP for a second time, 63 officers were found ready for command during BCAP 22 and appear as either principals or alternates. For some officers who were alternates on the BCAP 21 list or were found not yet ready for command during BCAP 21, they were invited to return to BCAP a second time based on their selection by the Fiscal Year 22 Lieutenant Colonels ACC CSL Board.

A candidate writes notes during the welcoming remark at the Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) on Nov. 4, 2020 at Fort Knox, Ky. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets.
A candidate writes notes during the welcoming remark at the Battalion Commander Assessment Program (BCAP) on Nov. 4, 2020 at Fort Knox, Ky. BCAP is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command. The results of BCAP inform the selection of officers for battalion command and key billets. (Photo Credit: Army Talent Management Task Force) VIEW ORIGINAL

Compared to the legacy CSL process, the BCAP-selected officers demonstrated that they are more physically fit, more cognitively capable, are better written and verbal communicators, and demonstrate less counterproductive leadership.

Counterproductive leadership, as defined in Army Doctrine Publication 6-22 Army Leadership and the Profession, is the demonstration of leader behaviors that violate one or more of the Army's core leader competencies or Army values, preventing a climate conducive to mission accomplishment.

Listen to a BCAP 22 podcast

To listen to a podcast about BCAP 22 with Maj. Gen. JP McGee, Director of the Army Talent Management Task Force, visit From the Green Notebook.

To learn more about the Army’s Battalion Commander Assessment Program, visit https://talent.army.mil/BCAP.