Candidates from Cohort 1 of the Colonels Command Assessment Program begin the psychometric test on day one of the five day assessment program on Fort Knox, Kentucky, September 11, 2020.  CCAP expands the Army's understanding of each officer's talents by including more relevant information to help the Army make more informed decisions about who is selected to command. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force)
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Candidates from Cohort 1 of the Colonels Command Assessment Program begin the psychometric test on day one of the five day assessment program on Fort Knox, Kentucky, September 11, 2020. CCAP expands the Army's understanding of each officer's talents by including more relevant information to help the Army make more informed decisions about who is selected to command. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force) (Photo Credit: SSG Daniel Schroeder) VIEW ORIGINAL
A candidate performs push ups for the physical fitness test as part of the five day assessment program on Fort Knox, Kentucky, September 11, 2020.  CCAP expands the Army's understanding of each officer's talents by including more relevant information to help the Army make more informed decisions about who is selected to command. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force)(U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force)
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A candidate performs push ups for the physical fitness test as part of the five day assessment program on Fort Knox, Kentucky, September 11, 2020. CCAP expands the Army's understanding of each officer's talents by including more relevant information to help the Army make more informed decisions about who is selected to command. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force)(U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Schroeder, Army Talent Management Task Force) (Photo Credit: SSG Daniel Schroeder) VIEW ORIGINAL
Army Chief of Staff James McConville and the Army’s senior enlisted advisor, Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston, hand out coins at the Army's Colonels Command Assessment Program Sept. 17, 2020 at Fort Knox, Ky., to Soldiers who have been instrumental in ensuring the success of the program. (Photo Credit: Eric Pilgrim, Fort Knox News)
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Army Chief of Staff James McConville and the Army’s senior enlisted advisor, Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston, hand out coins at the Army's Colonels Command Assessment Program Sept. 17, 2020 at Fort Knox, Ky., to Soldiers who have been instrumental in ensuring the success of the program. (Photo Credit: Eric Pilgrim, Fort Knox News) (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

The Army published the names of the officers selected for colonel-level command and key billets for fiscal year 2022. Common Access Card (CAC) users may access the list on the U.S. Army Human Resources Command website, https://www.hrc.army.mil/content/CSL%20-CURRENT%20SELECTION%20RESULTS.

In September, the Army held the first Colonels Command Assessment Program (CCAP) for officers who are eligible for consideration in the Fiscal Year 22 Colonels Active Competitive Category Centralized Selection List board.

The program is a five-day assessment to determine officers’ readiness for command and strategic potential. The results of CCAP inform the selection of officers for brigade-level command and general staff positions.

Officers who participated in CCAP 22 were found ready for command or not yet ready for command. Those who do not pass the standard Army height and weight screening event or who fail a three-event Army Physical Fitness Test do not continue in the program and are found not yet ready for command.

The other way officers are determined not yet ready for command is a decision made by a panel of senior officers during the Army Comprehensive Talent Interview. If an officer is determined not yet ready for command, they are notified by the first general officer in their chain of command and will have an opportunity to compete again the following year, if eligible.

For those the panel determines ready for command, they are selected as principals and alternates based on an order of merit list determined by a combination of their scores in five areas:

  • CSL Board Performance 
  • Physical Fitness 
  • Written Communication 
  • Verbal Communication
  • Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Assessment 

When compared to the list of principals that the legacy Command Selection List process would have been produced, CCAP 22 drove a 26 percent change. Stated differently, the legacy CSL would have presented a list of 180 officers selected as principals. After undergoing the Colonels Command Assessment Program, this list of 180 principals contains 47 different officers than the legacy CSL system. This supports the talent management principle that more relevant information about officers leads to different decisions about who is selected to command and general staff positions.

Compared to the legacy CSL process, the CCAP-selected officers demonstrated that they are more physically fit, more cognitively capable, are better written and verbal communicators, and demonstrate less counterproductive leadership. Counterproductive leadership, as defined in Army Doctrine Publication 6-22 Army Leadership and the Profession, is the demonstration of leader behaviors that violate one or more of the Army's core leader competencies or Army values, preventing a climate conducive to mission accomplishment.

To learn more about the Army’s Colonels Command Assessment Program, visit https://talent.army.mil/CCAP.