The National Native American Veterans Memorial opened to the public Nov. 11, 2020 on the grounds of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.  Brig. Gen. Douglas Lowrey, commanding general of the U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, participated in the virtual opening ceremony, noting that "this memorial will forever ensure that Native Americans who have served, Native Americans who are currently serving and Native Americans who will serve one day in the U.S. Armed Forces are honored in the nation's capitol.  To view the full opening ceremony / exhibit video, visit https://americanindian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm  As of November 2020, Lowrey remains the Army's only active duty general officer of Native American descent. He can trace his roots back to Maj. George "Rising Fawn" Lowrey, who was a U.S. Soldier, law enforcement officer and assistant Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The National Native American Veterans Memorial opened to the public Nov. 11, 2020 on the grounds of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Brig. Gen. Douglas Lowrey, commanding general of the U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, participated in the virtual opening ceremony, noting that "this memorial will forever ensure that Native Americans who have served, Native Americans who are currently serving and Native Americans who will serve one day in the U.S. Armed Forces are honored in the nation's capitol. To view the full opening ceremony / exhibit video, visit https://americanindian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm As of November 2020, Lowrey remains the Army's only active duty general officer of Native American descent. He can trace his roots back to Maj. George "Rising Fawn" Lowrey, who was a U.S. Soldier, law enforcement officer and assistant Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. (Photo Credit: Alan Karchmer) VIEW ORIGINAL
Brig. Gen. Douglas Lowrey
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Brig. Gen. Douglas Lowrey (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Maj. George Lowry was a U.S. Soldier, law enforcement office, translator and principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. (Artist unknown, oil painting attributed to George Catlin)
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. George Lowry was a U.S. Soldier, law enforcement office, translator and principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. (Artist unknown, oil painting attributed to George Catlin)
(Photo Credit: Courtesy photo)
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https://americanindian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm