Allen Forche, an U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command logistics specialist, also serves in the U.S. Army Reserves, Oct. 25. (Courtesy photo)
Allen Forche, an U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command logistics specialist, also serves in the U.S. Army Reserves, Oct. 25. (Courtesy photo) (Photo Credit: Antwaun Parrish) VIEW ORIGINAL

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Alabama – In 2001, Allen Forche decided to serve his country and enlist in the United States Army.

Forche, who now serves as an U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command logistics management specialist, is a native of Cameroon and migrated to the U.S. in 2001 through the Diversification Visa Program.

After arriving to the U.S., he began working and studying for his bachelor’s degree.

“I was going to school and working as a security officer at Virginia Commonwealth University prior to enlisting,” said Forche. “I earned my chemistry degree in 2006.”

After serving eight years as an enlisted Soldier Forche decided to become a commissioned officer. He commissioned in December 2009.

Forche, a logistics officer, stated that he became more interested in logistics during one of his deployments.

“I got a chance to see the ins and outs of movement within theater while deployed,” said Forche. “It was a great experience. When I came back from my deployment, I started working on my master’s degree in transportation and logistics management. I think this was a big turning point for me.”

He earned his master’s at American Military University in 2014.

During his career, Forche deployed three times. His first deployment was Iraq in 2011, Afghanistan 2013-2014 and Kuwait and United Arab Emirates in 2018.

Forche has been working at AMCOM since 2016. He works as a group lead logistics management specialist with UH-60 Blackhawks.

“I manage a lot of the blades for the Blackhawks and the display units,” said Forche.

With his military career as a Soldier and civilian employee, Forche stated that he has a better understanding of operations.

“It really gives a better overview of everything in the Army,” said Forche. “On the reservist side, I see a lot of the tactical and operation functions of the Army. As a civilian I am able to see more of the strategic operations.”

Forche continues to serve in the U.S. Army Reserves and currently holds the rank of major.