HONOLULU – Warrant Officer Alyson Tugaoen, currently assigned to the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, 311th Signal Command (Theater), along with her husband, Sgt. Maj. AJ Tugaoen (U.S. Army retired) and two children have always been a physically active family. From the time their children were small, the Tugaoens have incorporated physical fitness into their daily routine, believing that it plays a key role in mental resilience.“Physical strength may get you to a start line, but its mental strength that gets you to the finish line, with anything in life,” said AJ Tugaoen.For most of their lives, the dual-Army Reserve couple’s children, Noelani and Kekoa, have participated in road-running events, but more recently, they have ventured into the world of triathlon competition. Their mother believes discipline is the key to remaining physically, emotionally and mentally resilient.“Eating habits are a significant indicator of how our bodies react to physical training, so making sure we continue to eat healthy at a time when junk food seems so much easier has been a mental challenge,” Alyson Tugaoen said.The Tugaoens have also tried to keep their at-home routines as close to whatever normal looked like before everyone’s work and school situations changed. They still get up at the same time, do what’s required for work or school, and intentionally get out for some physical activity before dinner.“It’s this disciplined routine and knowing what comes next in day that has made for a smooth transition with the stay-at-home order, Alyson Tugaoen said.The extra time that has become available from the lack of office and school commutes has given them new goals to consider in open water swimming, new routes to ride on triathlon bikes, new paths to forge around the neighborhood as they get in a late afternoon run and newfound space on the waves to practice different tricks while surfing.