Camp Humphreys, Republic of Korea- July 26 marks the 70th anniversary of the Korean Service Corps or otherwise known as the “A-Frame Army.” U.S. Army Lt. Col. John E. Cooper, the KSC battalion commander, Sgt. Maj. David J. Caleb, KSC battalion senior enlisted advisor, Mr. Yi, Chin U, KSC battalion deputy commanding officer, and Mr. Yo, In Chon, KSC Union President, along with all the KSC company commanders, took some time to remember the fallen by visiting the Inje remembrance memorial on that day.“Today is the KSC’s 70th Anniversary,” said Cooper, “and during the Korean War all of us served as one team, fought and died together. In the same way we are honoring the fallen KCS heroes and the KSC families.”In 1950, the peninsula was in the midst of the Korean War and to help the war effort the Korean President, Syngman Rhee, signed Presidential Emergency Decree No. 6. This decree directed Korean laborers to help with the logistical movement of ammunition, fortification materials, food, and other supplies. This freed up U.S. and other NATO soldiers from carrying these items, so that when they came onto the battlefield, the Soldiers were not already exhausted with carrying the fore mentioned items.“[The decree] allowed the legal commandeering of national assets indispensable to fighting the war,” said Mr. Kim, Tae Kyong. “The most critical of these assets was man power resources…leading to the birth of the Korean Service Corps, originally referred to as the Civilian Transportation Corps.”The KSC’s nickname “A-Frame” was inspired by the U.S. Soldiers they worked with, because of the wooden backpacks that looked like the letter A. Yet, with Korea’s harsh weather and the constant threat of hostilities, these civilians traveled unarmed and on foot through terrain that was inaccessible to vehicles to ensure delivery of these supplies.“In the three years that followed, members of the KSC provided critical support to Eighth Army elements, which was instrumental in the defense of the Republic of Korea,” said Kim.Their sacrifice in the war was as significant as that of their brethren that fought in the Republic of Korea’s Armed Forces.“The KSC suffered nearly 10,000 Casualties during the Korean War and the KSC families were right there along with them,” said Cooper. “Let us never forget their sacrifices.”Today, the KSC still supports the logistic missions of U.S. Forces Korea and Eighth Army. Yet, their mission has expanded to a paramilitary function that supports heavy equipment transporters, fire support, air traffic control, water survival training, maintenance, and medical evacuation.To learn more about the KSC please visit: ksc.korea.army.milFor more about the 70th Anniversary Events visit: https://www.army.mil/article/237889