Theodore Roosevelt would be proud of Barbara Nall. She speaks softly and carries a big bottle of sanitizer.Ms. Nall is an Environmental Services Technician at Ireland Army Health Clinic (IRACH) on Fort Knox Kentucky. But a more apt job description, would be ‘Hero.’As a front-line warrior battling the invisible COVID-19 virus, Ms. Nall cleans to kill germs, keeping clinic patients and staff safe -- swipe after swipe, day after day, for 9 years. Combining a strong sense of dedication with a humble spirit and a relentless work ethic, Barbara stays busy as she moves throughout the clinic. She and her colleagues sanitize everything, including the chairs, at least 3 or 4 times a day. The IRACH sanitation staff is heavily relied upon by the command and community to prevent spread of the coronavirus. They are keenly aware of how high the stakes are -- and mean it when they clean it.“We’re mission essential,” says Nall, who refers to her job as Housekeeper.‘Housekeeping Heroes’ are a mission-essential part of the battle plan to beat the infectious invader, per IRACH Commander Colonel Hugh McLean.“Deep medical cleaning our medical clinics is foundational to our success in preventing coronavirus in the Medical Department Activity (MEDDAC) facilities and across Fort Knox. I confidently depend on our Environmental Services staff’s focused attention-to-detail and dedication,” McLean states.From the cleaners to the commander, it’s a team effort.Behind her mask Ms. Nall smiles as she says, “It makes me feel like I’m doing my part.” Far from a thankless custodial job, she reveals, “A lot of people come by and say ‘thanks.’”Contagious in unclean areas, the coronavirus isn’t so thankful. Up against a soft-spoken hero who carries a big bottle and cloth, the COVID-19 virus stands little chance when Barbara’s keeping house.