Military Children use 3D printer skills to help COVID-19 healthcare workers
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Savannah, 10, and Shyanne Thomas, 8, are the daughters of Command Nuclear Science Officer, CPT Theodore Thomas. When these girls saw on the news that healthcare providers didn't have enough PPE when caring for COVID19 patients, they sprung into action and 3D printed face shields for healthcare workers. (Photo Credit: Cpt. Theodore Thomas) VIEW ORIGINAL
Military Children use 3D printer skills to help COVID-19 healthcare workers
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Savannah, 10, and Shyanne Thomas, 8, the daughters of Command Nuclear Science Officer, CPT Theodore Thomas, have shipped over 45 face shields to Methodist Dallas Medical Center in Dallas, Texas and 24 face shields to Bel Air Health and Rehabilitation Center in Bel Air, Maryland. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

Incredible compassion and talent within the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives Command isn't just limited to its workforce but also extends to its military children.

Savannah Thomas, 10, and Shyanne Thomas, 8, are the daughters of Cpt. Theodore Thomas, the 20th CBRNE Command's Radiation Safety Officer on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The two military children were watching the news when they saw that healthcare workers didn't have enough Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when caring for COVID-19 patients. Being determined to help, they approached their parents to see how they could contribute to the new frontlines and sprung into action.

Working with their mom and dad, Savannah and Shyanne found a National Institutes of Health (NIH) approved plan to 3D print face shields. Using this approved plan, the girls set off to 3D print and assemble face shields. Starting off with sending face shields to people they knew in the healthcare field, the girls quickly expanded this radius to give to local places in need.

Savannah and Shyanne have made and sent 46 face shields to the Methodist Dallas Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. They've also created 24 face shields for workers at the Bel Air Health And Rehabilitation Center in Bel Air, Maryland and have sent several face shields to New York and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.

"One of the greatest opportunities to come out of this is that our girls are seeing this impact, and they are learning the value of service," said Cpt. Thomas. "We are grateful to have the opportunity to be able to help where needed."

For more information on Thomas' efforts, you can visit their website here.