This year the Army and our nation celebrate 50 years of Earth Day. From installations on the Chesapeake Bay to training sites in the Mojave Desert, the Army has been managing some of our nation's most valuable environmental resources since before Earth Day became a national day of recognition.Stewardship of our ecological treasures contributes to quality environment and is an important part of military readiness. By preserving our nation's history, conserving natural resources, and restoring lands, we protect where Army personnel live, train and work while keeping our Army mission ready. Army forests and wetlands are often the last refuge for some threatened and endangered species. The Army protects 225 threatened and endangered species on its installations and training sites. Every effort taken to ensure our ecosystems thrive also provides realistic and resilient training grounds for our Soldiers.Investments in environmentally friendly alternatives to the solvents, chemicals and other materials needed to operate and maintain Army weapon systems, ammunition, vehicles, aircraft and support equipment helps prevent pollution and reduces disposal and remediation costs.Environmental stewardship is an investment in everyone's future. Every effort you take to lessen your effect on the environment, every time you use less water or energy, recycle or reuse products, or select products with less packaging rated as more environmentally friendly or energy efficient, you too are making a difference. By safeguarding the environment today, we can ensure cleaner land, cleaner water and cleaner air in the future.Earth Day isn't just what we do on April 22 each year but what we should do every day. To learn more about what the Army is doing for Earth Day 2020 visit https://aec.army.mil/index.php/earth-day. With your help, we will be able to look back in another 50 years and know that our Army protected vulnerable facilities, infrastructure, and environmental resources.