JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (Dec. 30, 2019) -- Army officials have chosen the chief of business operations for the Mission and Installation Contracting Command Field Directorate Office at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, for a professional development opportunity aimed at producing senior civilian leaders with an enterprise perspective.

Terri Williams learned of her competitive selection earlier this month for the Senior Enterprise Talent Management Program, which is one of the programs developed under the Army Civilian Workforce Transformation initiative.

Designed to prepare senior civilian employees to assume positions of greater responsibility, Williams said the SETM opportunity directly aligns with her goal of reaching the next level of "better."

"Every manager is not automatically a leader; therefore, I'm reaching for the 'better' communication, the 'better' thinking and thought process of obtaining successful engagements and meeting mission goals, and the 'better' that comes with being open, flexible and exposed to new thoughts, ideas and processes that are of benefit," Williams said. She added that she wants to remove the negative connotation that comes with the word change and ensure the implementation of that change is valuable. "Most importantly (I'm reaching) the 'better' as it relates to our most important asset -- people -- engaging to ensure each and every team member is treated with the dignity and respect they deserve. Whether you are awarding or administering contracts, you are an important asset to the acquisition process."

Williams possesses 24 years of acquisition experience spanning positions with the Air Force, NASA and Army. Her certifications include Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act Level III in contracting and Federal Acquisition Certification in contracting. She has served as the MICC FDO-Fort Eustis chief of business operations since May 2015 responsible for directing various programs to include the Contract Writing System, quality assurance, logistics, cost-price analysis, customer support element, industrial property, operations security, training, systems and hardware automation, Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System, unliquidated obligations, and closeouts.

Williams said her successful pursuit for career broadening opportunities began in earnest this past spring upon approaching her 10-year mark with the MICC.

"I placed three irons in the fire thinking positive as to how excited I would be if at least one fired up. Well, all three have," she said.

She spent three weeks beginning in August as a member of Headquarters U.S. Army Central Inspector General detail for a fiscal 2019 fourth quarter contracting process and oversight inspection that included travel to Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar. She also applied for and was selected to serve as the forward deputy director for the assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition, logistics and technology at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, deploying in the coming weeks for six months.

"Now, with the SETM selection, words cannot express how thrilled and thankful I am for all of these opportunities," Williams said. "I leaned in and worked really hard on every detail of my SETM package."

SETM candidates are selected based on program criteria established by the Army and includes a review of resumes, statements of interest, endorsements, appraisals, and executive core qualifications assessments. Candidates are then rank-ordered by the SETM selection board. Williams anticipates an announcement of her SETM assignment in February.

The Army Civilian Workforce Transformation is a training initiative established by the assistant secretary of the Army for manpower and Reserve affairs to prepare employees for leadership positions throughout the Army.


About the MICC:
Headquartered at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Mission and Installation Contracting Command consists of about 1,500 military and civilian members who are responsible for contracting goods and services in support of Soldiers as well as readying trained contracting units for the operating force and contingency environment when called upon. MICC contracts are vital in feeding more than 200,000 Soldiers every day, providing many daily base operations support services at installations, facilitate training in the preparation of more than 100,000 conventional force members annually, training more than 500,000 students each year, and maintaining more than 14.4 million acres of land and 170,000 structures.