Fort Drum, N.Y. -- Spc. Austin Tome, a Brogue, Pennsylvania native, is a 642nd Engineer Support Company Soldier carrying on his family's long military legacy. Tome's grandfather started the family's tradition of service when he fought in World War II. Other members of his family also served, including his father, aunt, and uncle. "I've had generations of my family members join the Army. I figured it was my time to do my part," said Tome.

Tome is a Horizontal Construction Engineer assigned to the 642nd Engineer Support Company, 20th Engineer Brigade. When he first arrived at Fort Drum, his unit instantly noticed his motivation and positive work ethic.

"I was his sponsor when he first got here and I immediately knew that he was a hard-charging individual, always ready to work and never complained," said Staff Sgt. Cory Gent. "Definitely a motivated individual, he's a great asset to any type of team," Gent added.

Tome's military occupational specialty includes operating bulldozers, cranes, and other heavy equipment to shape the terrain and move material to complete construction projects for the Army. His unit recently participated in the Mountain Peak training exercise on Fort Drum. Mountain Peak is a multi-week event to help Soldiers improve warfighting skills. This training prepares 10th Mountain Division Soldiers for deployment to combat environments.

The 642nd ESC helped infantry units build fighting positions such as berms, trenches, tank ditches, and observation points. These earthworks help shape the battlefield by providing mobility and increasing survivability for Soldiers fighting against enemy forces.

During Mountain Peak, Tome led Soldiers and refined his skills as a Horizontal Construction Engineer.
"He's developing very well, and he's also developing his subordinates," said Staff Sgt. Justin Revisky. "He's got four Soldiers that are underneath him currently, and he's teaching them very well. He's becoming a good mentor," Revisky added.

Tome said he's proud of the work he's doing and the training keeps him engaged and prepared for whatever may come.

"We're constantly doing something new," said Tome. "I'm able to think on my feet, nothing's ever the same. Depending on what unit you're in, you could be doing something completely different."