Capturing the moment: 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) supports Team Army at DoD 2019 Warrior Games
By Joseph Jones, Madigan Army Medical Center Public Affairs

TAMPA, Fla. -- It's no question to the supporters and fans attending the 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games, that the outstanding athletes participating are a sight to behold when they are in their competitive zone. Witnessing these fearless ill, injured, and wounded Soldiers and veterans that make up Team Army is an awe-inspiring experience. For those not able to attend this year's Warrior Games, capturing world-class images, and recording visual documentation for the sake of posterity, are members of the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera); a specialized unit of Soldiers stationed at Fort Meade, Maryland, on location to support Team Army at the Warrior Games. These Soldiers are specifically trained for taking on the arduous task of capturing the crucial imagery of Army missions and this week, Team Army athletes at the Warrior Games.

Working inconspicuously to the casual observer at the sidelines of every event, and in the midst of the action, these Soldiers strive to gain every possible photo and video in real-time to reflect Team Army's athletes at their best. The nine-person team is led by Staff Sgt. Michael Loggins, a photographer, videographer, and the Non- Commissioned Officer In Charge for the Combat Camera crew covering Team Army at the DoD Warrior Games. "Covering the athletes at the Warrior Games has been a truly humbling experience. I have seen nothing but tremendous effort put out by all of the athletes. It got to the point when taking photographs, that I would have to take off in a sprint just to keep up with the athletes that are here," said Loggins.

U.S. Army Spc. Evens Milcette Jr., a combat documentation specialist with Combat Camera at Warrior Games for the first time, is one of the Soldiers visually documenting Team Army. "It can be physically demanding in the environment, but we're trained for that," said Milcette. "The performance of the athletes here have allowed for us to get some great imagery. This particular mission has been great for us and developing our skills even more, which increases our readiness as a team for other missions."

For many, the photographs taken at Warrior Games are more than just images. U.S. Army Spc. Katelyn Strange, a combat documentation and production specialist who is doing photo and video production to support Warrior Games, approaches each athlete's visual documentation as a unique story to tell. "Following Team Army for the last two weeks has been amazing," said Strange. "I wanted to meet each warrior competing to better tell their stories. "Being able to talk to them and get to know them has helped me be able to understand their personal journey and how to approach capturing their best and most meaningful moments."

U.S. Army Pfc. Dominique Dixon, a multimedia illustrator with the team, has found new inspiration for professional and person growth witnessing athletes at the Warrior Games who have overcome an array of adversity and challenges. "I didn't realize how fortunate I was to come here and do this amazing job," said Dixon. "Covering these athletes and (visually) capturing them is a part of history. It's been inspiring. I don't know if the athletes know it or not, but they are truly motivating. They make me want to go out and push myself further than what I've done and go to the next level," added Dixon.

The 2019 DoD Warrior Games were held from June 21-30 in Tampa Bay, Florida. The athletes who participated in the competition are comprised of wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans representing the U. S. Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Special Operations Command. Athletes from the United Kingdom Armed Forces, Australian Defence Force, Canadian Armed Forces, Armed Forces of the Netherlands, and the Danish Armed Forces also competed in this year's DoD Warrior Games.

For more information about the 2019 DoD Warrior Games visit: https://dodwarriorgames.com